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Welcome to the Coxswain's Grot - Issue 108.

Fellow Submariners, welcome to another fortnight edition. What an interesting time we are in. COVID rife in Victoria, NSW not far behind. The irony of Grand Finals for two codes of football played by two home based teams in different States and the goings on in our Submarine Community both personal and professional especially the announcement of Nuclear Boats in Aus.

ALL ROUND LOOK



Submarine Institute of Australia
   
 
Virtual Tickets on sale for SubSTEC6
Submarine Institute of Australia - 4 October 2021
 
Tickets for virtual participation in SubSTEC6 are available on the SIA Conference page. These tickets are discounted by 40% and provide access to live and recorded sessions of SubSTEC6 for up to 6 months after the event. Register Now!
 
 
Submarine News
   
 
OPINION: Submarines could be major boost to WA economy
South Western Times (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 4 October 2021
":"The recent decision to refocus Australia’s critically important naval program to a nuclear-powered submarine ...
 
 
 
Acquiring subs early makes sense
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 4 October 2021
While Defence Industry Minister Melissa Price wants Australian jobs to be at the centre of Australias fleet of nuclear-powered submarines, it would make sense for at least the first couple to be leased or built overseas. Three weeks ago Defence Minister ...
While Defence Industry Minister Melissa Price wants Australian jobs to be at the centre of Australias fleet of nuclear-powered submarines, it would make sense for at least the first couple to be leased or built overseas. Three weeks ago Defence Minister .
 
 
The ABC’s coverage of the AUKUS nuclear subs deal lacked depth
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 4 October 2021
What is the point of a national broadcaster if it cannot produce serious and sustained analysis of the most important Australian diplomatic and defence agreement since the signing of the ANZUS pact 70 years ago
What is the point of a national broadcaster if it cannot produce serious and sustained analysis of the most important Australian diplomatic and defence agreement since the signing of the ANZUS pact 70 years ago
 
 
Newspoll: Subs deal wins backing amid fears over China
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 3 October 2021
A significant majority of voters back the construction of a nuclear-powered submarine fleet for the Australian navy amid community anxiety over the perceived national security threat posed by China.
A significant majority of voters back the construction of a nuclear-powered submarine fleet for the Australian navy amid community anxiety over the perceived national security threat posed by China.
 
 
Defence Industry Minister Melissa Price supports local submarine build
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 3 October 2021
Defence Industry Minister Melissa Price has backed the nations local shipbuilders to deliver the new AUKUS fleet of nuclear-powered submarines, despite some of Australias most experienced political and foreign policy leaders calling for a local build to ...
Defence Industry Minister Melissa Price has backed the nations local shipbuilders to deliver the new AUKUS fleet of nuclear-powered submarines, despite some of Australias most experienced political and foreign policy leaders calling for a local build to .
 
 
Vatican drops its oar into Aussie bid for nuclear submarines
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 3 October 2021
The Vatican has raised concerns about AUKUS, Australias defence collaboration with the US and Britain, especially the agreement to help the Australian Navy acquire a fleet of eight nuclear-powered submarines.
The Vatican has raised concerns about AUKUS, Australias defence collaboration with the US and Britain, especially the agreement to help the Australian Navy acquire a fleet of eight nuclear-powered submarines.
 
 
Oz’s Choice: AUKUS And The Break With Paris – Analysis
Eurasia Review - 3 October 2021
By Manoj Joshi
largest EEZ’s in the world. Australia has experience in manufacturing submarines, but its Collins class, built to a Swedish design, was not
 
 
Why Australia Opted for AUKUS
Quillette - 3 October 2021
There's more to Australia’s decision to cancel its submarine contract with France than offending the French, risking an EU free trade deal ...
the ability to lease US submarines to cover any capability gap that arises as the Collins class is phased out. While submarines were the
 
 
After years as a San Diego tourist draw, rusty Soviet sub is headed to the scrap yard
Los Angeles Times - 3 October 2021
SAN DIEGO — For 15 years, visitors to the Maritime Museum on San Diego’s downtown waterfront could climb aboard a retired Soviet attack ...
the October 1962 Cuban missile crisis, when other Foxtrot submarines armed with nuclear-tipped torpedoes got into a nervy cat-and-mouse game
 
 
You say it 'gnucular', I say it 'gnuclear'
The Canberra Times (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 3 October 2021
Homer knows what's up. Unkind commentators are having a lot of fun with the prime minister's trademark inability ...
's decision to arm our nation to the teeth with nuclear-powered submarines. Those scoffing at his mispronunciation of the word accuse it is
 
 
Between AUKUS and AUSMIN, Australia has crossed the rubicon
John Menadue - 3 October 2021
(Image: Unsplash) Through the combination of AUKUS and AUSMIN, Australia has locked in its strategic dependence on the US — probably ...
of worms about whether this might include nuclear warheads! Taken together with AUKUS and the “forever” submarine debacle it is hard not to
 
 
Royal Navy recruitment drive in 1960s targeted 'public and grammar school sixth-formers'
Yahoo! News UK - 2 October 2021
Royal Navy A Royal Navy recruitment drive in the 1960s was designed to target “public and grammar school sixth-formers”, documents reveal. ...
a simulated underwater escape; ascending through 30m of water in the submarine escape training tank – now known as Fort Blockhouse – which
 
 
AUKUS deal leaves Russia 'concerned' that Australia will have nuclear-powered submarines
ABC News - 2 October 2021
Russia says it is concerned that the AUKUS defence agreement between Australia, Britain and the United States will allow Australia to enter ...
France and China operate such submarines. The three-way pact, under which Australia will obtain nuclear submarine technology from the United
 
 
PM urged to abandon plan to build subs
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 2 October 2021
The Morrison government should abandon plans to build eight nuclear-powered attack submarines in Adelaide and instead accelerate efforts to acquire an Australian nuclear submarine capability by leasing a boat from the US or Britain, followed by an ...
The Morrison government should abandon plans to build eight nuclear-powered attack submarines in Adelaide and instead accelerate efforts to acquire an Australian nuclear submarine capability by leasing a boat from the US or Britain, followed by an ...
 
 
AUKUS deal risks leaving us without a sub capability at all
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 2 October 2021
The fundamental concern about the AUKUS military alliance does not relate to Australia obtaining nuclear-powered submarines. By the time these vessels materialise, the technology will have moved on. The last of the current Royal Navy Astute-class and the ...
The fundamental concern about the AUKUS military alliance does not relate to Australia obtaining nuclear-powered submarines. By the time these vessels materialise, the technology will have moved on. The last of the current Royal Navy Astute-class and the
 
 
Argentine ex-president to be questioned over sunk sub 'espionage'
Space War - 1 October 2021
Former Argentine president Mauricio Macri will be questioned in a probe into spy claims regarding the 2017 sinking of a submarine that left ...
-euro submarine deal with Paris in favour of nuclear-powered US or British alternatives. Turnbull, whose government approved the submarine
 
 
Subs letter shows no deception of French
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 1 October 2021
Frances claim that Australia deceived it over the 90bn submarine project on the same day as it was cancelled have been torpedoed.
Frances claim that Australia deceived it over the 90bn submarine project on the same day as it was cancelled have been torpedoed.
 
 
EU postpones trade talks with Australia amid sub deal anger
Daily Mail - 1 October 2021
By Colin Packham CANBERRA, Oct 1 (Reuters) - Australia's trade minister said on Friday talks with the European Union over a trade deal have ...
's Naval Group to build a fleet of conventional submarines and will instead build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines with U.S. and
 
 
OPINION | SSN vs SSK: time on station or a numbers game? - Baird Maritime
Baird Maritime - 1 October 2021
Are nuclear-powered submarines better – more cost-effective – for Australia’s operational needs than conventionally-powered ones? This is ...
Are nuclear-powered submarines better – more cost-effective – for Australia’s operational needs than conventionally-powered ones? This is
 
 
Melissa Price gains more cabinet power in federal reshuffle
The Mandarin - 1 October 2021
Defence industry minister Melissa Price’s promotion, with science and technology added to her federal portfolio, was announced by Scott ...
like ANSTO and the CSIRO in addressing nuclear capabilities that will be necessary under the nuclear submarine program ,” Morrison said.
 
 
Submarines thrust Australia forward
@AuManufacturing - 1 October 2021
By Michael Sharpe
thought much about the nuclear industry and propulsion systems? The Rolls Royce nuclear propulsion systems in the UK submarine fleet have
 
 
Clear and present danger: AUKUS and Australia’s folly
Monash University - LENS - 1 October 2021
Australia’s nuclear submarine agreement with the UK and US puts it on a dangerous and subservient path.
Australia’s nuclear submarine agreement with the UK and US puts it on a dangerous and subservient path.
 
 
Australia’s defensive stability in the region is with nuclear energy
The Daily Telegraph (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 1 October 2021
It’s clear that the way forward for Australia’s defensive stability in the region is with nuclear energy, writes ...
, cost overruns and delays in our submarine procurement for decades. Australia’s adoption of nuclear-powered submarines as part of the AUKUS
 
 
Turnbull lacked proper advice on subs
The Canberra Times (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 1 October 2021
There weren't enough qualified experts to advise Malcolm Turnbull on the Collins class submarine replacement, a ...
't enough qualified experts to advise Malcolm Turnbull on the Collins class submarine replacement, a reader says. Picture: Defence Media In
 
 
Submarine jobs will be sent offshore under nuclear deal with US and UK, defence suppliers say
MSN - Australia - 1 October 2021
Local defence suppliers fear a decision to harness American and British technology to build Australian nuclear-powered submarines will see ...
these nuclear submarines." Bronwyn Evans predicts Australia will be heavily reliant on overseas expertise for the new nuclear submarine
 
 
Price takes on greater responsibility in Ministerial reshuffle
Defence Connect - 1 October 2021
Minister for Defence Industry Melissa Price has taken on yet further Ministerial responsibilities, Prime Minister Scott Morrison confirmed ...
: Australia is expected to become the only non-nuclear nation to possess nuclear submarine capabilities; Australia, UK and US expected to
 
 
The bitter aftertaste of the Aukus deal
The National - 1 October 2021
Macron has revived talk of creating a European defence force to rival the existing Nato alliance
A Rivercat ferry passes by the Royal Australian Navy's Collins-class submarine HMAS Waller as it leaves Sydney Harbour on May 4, 2020.
 
 
What AUKUS Means For Australia: More Than Nuclear Subs
Breaking Defense - 30 September 2021
UK’s Astute Class nuclear submarine. (File) When the United States, United Kingdom and Australia announced their new AUKUS agreement, the ...
political culture of the ruling Communist Party. Now, to the submarines. The Future Submarine project made sense at the time, and of the
 
 
AUKUS pact: Ex-subs chief Peter Briggs’s warning over workforce fail
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 30 September 2021
The former head of Australias submarine squadron, retired Rear Admiral Peter Briggs, says the nations submarine workforce will have to grow to three times its current size to operate a fleet of nuclear-powered subs a near-impossible feat without buying ...
The former head of Australias submarine squadron, retired Rear Admiral Peter Briggs, says the nations submarine workforce will have to grow to three times its current size to operate a fleet of nuclear-powered subs a near-impossible feat without buying .
 
 
Morrison’s subs disaster will have to be fixed no matter who wins
MSN - Australia - 30 September 2021
No matter who wins the election, the major problems created by Scott Morrison's submarines decision will have to be addressed in the next ...
have to decide whether it seeks to accelerate the proposed nuclear submarine deal by purchasing ones fully manufactured elsewhere — likely
 
 
The raison d’état behind Australia’s submarine decision
The Strategist - 30 September 2021
French anger over Australia’s decision to dump the diesel–electric submarine project is entirely justified and understandable. Even if, as ...
do what was necessary to ensure the adequacy of its future submarine fleet by opting for nuclear propulsion—even if France didn’t think it
 
 
Nuclear inspection under AUKUS deal 'very tricky' says atomic agency head
Sky News Australia (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 30 September 2021
Nuclear inspections of Australia under the AUKUS deal will be "very tricky" and could lead to a weakened non-proliferation system, says the ...
AUKUS and the plan for nuclear submarine cooperation," spokesperson Hua Chunying said during the ministry's daily press conference. 'The
 
 
Will the RAN lease nuclear-powered submarines?
Australian Defence Magazine - 30 September 2021
There’s much we don’t yet know about how we will acquire our new submarines. Even the Government and Defence don’t know, which is why ...
system.” The big question is: will this approach get Australian submariners into nuclear submarines a decade or more sooner than waiting for
 
 
Are nuclear powered submarines a move in the right direction for Australia?
Catholic Outlook - 30 September 2021
The Australian Government’s decision to buy nuclear-powered submarines has brought to the surface once again big questions around how ...
strike capacity is not the answer. These submarines will be nuclear powered rather than nuclear armed. This is an important distinction,
 
 
Senate Estimates more important than ever
Australian Defence Magazine - 30 September 2021
The unprecedented clampdown on Defence’s engagement with media imposed – or agreed to without explanation – by Defence Minister Peter ...
, Air Marshal Hupfeld added. Considerable time was spent not only on Future Submarine progress – which, of course, was scrapped in September
 
 
Australia’s nuclear submarine decision leaves more questions than answers
The Strategist - 30 September 2021
It is correct, as former prime minister Malcolm Turnbull has asserted , that few of the questions raised by the government’s announcement ...
will we maintain an effective submarine capability? On that schedule, our Collins submarines will be older than the Indonesian submarine KRI
 
 
Former BAE Systems Australia CTO joins Babcock
Defence Connect - 30 September 2021
Babcock Australasia has appointed a defence industry veteran to spearhead its engineering and technology team.
140 frigate and supporting the Royal Australian Navy’s transition to nuclear-powered submarines and sustainment under the AUKUS agreement.
 
 
Yes, we’ve cancelled the French, but now what?
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 30 September 2021
As things stand, it is unlikely Australia will ever get a nuclear submarine. All that we have done so far is cancel the French submarine. My guess is this delays any submarine at all by at least 10 years.
As things stand, it is unlikely Australia will ever get a nuclear submarine. All that we have done so far is cancel the French submarine. My guess is this delays any submarine at all by at least 10 years.
 
 
Sweden's Saab Views Modernisation Opportunities With Australia Getting US-UK Submarines
Republic World - 29 September 2021
Sweden’s Aerospace company, Saab, is eyeing opportunities for modernisation and maintenance after Australia decided to go nuclear under the ...
same generation as the Collins submarines, we are well-positioned to support a life extension programme of the Collins submarines,” adding
 
 
Australia ‘clearly needs’ a nuclear industry to get to net zero emissions | The Australian
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 29 September 2021
Australian Nuclear Association's John Harries says the nation “clearly needs” a nuclear industry to fix up the energy system and get to net zero carbon emissions. It comes as NSW One Nation Leader Mark Latham says he intends to bring his Bill to lift ...
Australian Nuclear Association's John Harries says the nation “clearly needs” a nuclear industry to fix up the energy system and get to net zero carbon emissions. It comes as NSW One Nation Leader Mark Latham says he intends to bring his Bill to lift .
 
 
Australian Shipbuilders Debate Nuclear Reactor Safety In Wake Of Submarine Deal
gCaptain - 29 September 2021
By Matthew Burgess (Bloomberg) Australia’s surprise deal with the U.S. and Britain for nuclear-powered submarines has shaken its Asian ...
($4.4 billion) program to extend the life of its aging Collins Class submarines, with state-owned ASC Pty planning to hire workers from the
 
 
‘Appalling’: Former PMs blast submarines deal, question AUKUS
The New Daily - 29 September 2021
Malcolm Turnbull is the latest former prime minister to blast the federal government’s much-maligned handling of the nuclear submarines ...
” in its international affairs, and that the nuclear subs plan was essentially “donating eight submarines paid for by us to the command of
 
 
HHI floats out third KSS-III submarine built for South Korean navy
Naval Today - 29 September 2021
South Korean shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) has launched the third 3000-ton KSS-III submarine built for the Republic of Korea ...
. They will also have improved sonar and combat systems performance. The first and the second KSS-III submarine was constructed by South
 
 
Turnbull savages Morrison over 'humiliating' move: 'Can't be trusted'
Yahoo!7 News (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 29 September 2021
Former prime minister Malcolm Turnbull has savaged current leader Scott Morrison in a scathing address to the ...
Macron and said Australia wanted to look at potentially acquiring nuclear submarines, his French counterpart would have been "supportive".
 
 
Former US Secretary of the Navy, now Scott Morrison’s Oaks Broker on Submarine Projects | Aukus
Sydney News Today - 29 September 2021
The former US Secretary of the Navy, who advised the Australian Government on breaking the French submarine transaction, now acts as an ...
Obama administrations, has long been involved in monitoring Australia’s future submarine programs, including a scrutiny of the initial
 
 
Australia will have to go nuclear to keep nuclear subs running
Brisbane Times (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 29 September 2021
National AUKUS With the swirl of media soundbites, the impression has been created that the Australian government ...
by US Navy nuclear engineers, was that Australia could not operate a sovereign nuclear submarine fleet without the civil nuclear industry
 
 
AUKUS security pact: Time is not on our side
MSN.com - 28 September 2021
On Sept. 15, the U.S., UK, and Australia announced a trilateral security pact, termed AUKUS. Under the agreement, Australia has cancelled ...
, Australia requires modern submarines. Technical, mechanical, and manpower issues have plagued the Collins-class boats since they were
 
 
AUKUS submarine deal 'very tricky' for nuclear inspectors -IAEA chief
Business Mayor - 28 September 2021
/**/ /**/ /**/ (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); /**/ By Francois Murphy VIENNA (Reuters) – The head of the United ...
diesel-powered submarines. It would also be the first time that a party to the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty obtains nuclear submarines,
 
 
Australians should thank their lucky stars for Scott Morrison
The Daily Telegraph (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 28 September 2021
At least Australia has an assured leader like Scott Morrison and not a bumbling Joe Biden, writes Miranda Devine.
aggression in the Indo-Pacific and if Australia’s purchase of nuclear-powered submarines through AUKUS would be a game changer – yes, he
 
 
Collins Class Submarine Upgrade Will Extend Australia’s Non-Nuclear Boats To 2048
Naval News - 28 September 2021
Hints are emerging as to what the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) might be planning for their Collins Class submarines. They are often regarded ...
employs its submarines). Building on this tradition, the Swedish-designed Collins Class is at the larger end of the non-nuclear submarine
 
 
Australia's decision not changing France's strategy in Indo-Pacific, Macron says
The Jakarta Post - 28 September 2021
French President Emmanuel Macron (2nd left) and Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull (center) stand on the deck of HMAS Waller, a ...
Turnbull (center) stand on the deck of HMAS Waller, a Collins-class submarine operated by the Royal Australian Navy, at Garden Island in
 
 
New polling: Australians say fire up the nukes
The Spectator Australia - 28 September 2021
This is one of those bonus weeks for poll wonks when we get a Newspoll on Monday and the fortnightly Essential Research poll just 24 hours ...
for the AUKUS/nuclear submarines announcement ( a solid majority are in favour ). They’ve also asked about nuclear-generated electricity
 
 
The giant question mark over SA's role in nuclear submarine push
InDaily - 28 September 2021
Australia’s nuclear submarine ambition has few knowns and many unknowns – and one of these casts a giant shadow over South Australia’s role ...
20 out-of-service submarines contain nuclear fuel which needs to be removed using nuclear-regulator approved dock infrastructure and
 
 
AUKUS and Australia’s nuclear submarines
Lowy Institute for International Policy - 28 September 2021
 
AUKUS and Australia’s nuclear submarines
 
 
CDIC to be replaced
Australian Defence Magazine - 28 September 2021
The Centre for Defence Industry Capability (CDIC) will be replaced by the end of the year, Minister for Defence Industry Melissa Price ...
SMEs and workers remains uncertain due to the scrapping of the ‘Future Submarine’ contract, it’s more important than ever that our local
 
 
Submarine shift puts thousands of jobs at risk: unions
The Sydney Morning Herald (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 28 September 2021
The nation’s peak union body has lashed the federal government’s decision to dump a $90 billion submarine contract ...
. "You don't buy nuclear submarines because you want Aussie jobs. You buy nuclear submarines because you want submarine security. “The risks
 
 
Timely realisation of the Australian nuclear submarine force
Defence Connect - 28 September 2021
Former RAN officer Chris Skinner explains how Australia could fill a potential capability gap exposed ahead of the delivery of a nuclear- ...
Chris Skinner explains how Australia could fill a potential capability gap exposed ahead of the delivery of a nuclear-powered submarine
 
 
Nuclear subs a political stunt setting up a khaki election
The Daily Advertiser (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 27 September 2021
The Morrison government's announcement of a new defence alliance with the US and UK (AUKUS), together with nuclear ...
suggest that Australia can maintain sophisticated nuclear submarines without support from a highly skilled domestic nuclear industry. This
 
 
No room for delay in Australia’s transition to nuclear-powered submarines
The Strategist - 27 September 2021
When journalists used to ask me whether I thought we should continue with the Attack-class submarine program, I’d answer with the old joke ...
around 2025. As we moved through time and the future submarine schedule moved off into the future, it became clear that Defence would need
 
 
Brazil might get nuclear-powered submarines even before Australia
The Economist - 27 September 2021
The country has been working on the technology for decades
the miniature reactors that can fit inside the cramped hull of a submarine. This work survived the end of military rule in 1985. It then
 
 
Australia’s new $100b submarine could be a waste of money
The Advertiser (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 27 September 2021
They take 20 years to make and Australia has alienated France by buying them – but there might be something even ...
too late. Now a top academic has dropped a bomb on Australia’s nuclear submarine dreams – labelling them dinosaurs of the deep. “Subs … have
 
 
Two political decisions that will reverberate through ages
Livewire - 27 September 2021
\ \&https://www.afr.com/wealthersonal-finance/two-political-decisions-that-will-reverberate-20210922-p58ttc\& \&nofollow noopener\&\In the ...
\&_blank\& \&nofollow noopener\&\bold decision to acquire eight nuclear-powered submarines\\ via a new “three-eyes” alliance with the US and
 
 
Sensible defence spending could rebuild our manufacturing sector
The Advertiser (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 26 September 2021
Defence procurement should present an almost perfect environment to build a sustainable industrial base.
the very recent past, and become a glorified assembler of whichever nuclear submarine we end up buying. The French deal was problematic from
 
 
Defence staff offered counselling for 'stress and uncertainty' after French sub deal scrapped
ABC News - 26 September 2021
As Australia switches to a nuclear-powered fleet, military personnel and Defence Department staff who are feeling distressed by the ...
for the many hundreds of contractors working on the now-abandoned Future Submarine project. Last week, Defence formally informed Lockheed
 
 
Why Australia-France submarine deal collapse was predictable
Deccan Herald - 25 September 2021
By Romain Fathi for The Conversation, Australia’s unilateral cancellation of its contract to purchase French submarines and sign up for the ...
repeat itself. Contracts took years to be negotiated with Sweden for the Collins-class submarines in the 1980s, the same problem that can be
 
 
Donald Kirk: New AUKUS alliance challenges China
Wacotrib.com - 25 September 2021
The acronym AUKUS, when you try to pronounce it, sounds like some weird wild animal, an AUKUS. The initials stand for Australia, U.K., U.S ...
” is cause for alarm, but this submarine won’t be hefting nuclear weapons, at least for the foreseeable future. Australia is not yet a
 
 
Panel: Technical Pacts Like AUKUS Blunt China's Edge in Pacific – USNI News – USNI News
Business Mayor - 25 September 2021
/**/ /**/ /**/ (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); /**/ Australian, Indian and U.S. ships sail past each other as fixed- ...
agreement that will supply the Royal Australian Navy with a nuclear submarine program bring allies together by sharing technology when faced
 
 
AUKUS alliance: Morrison has seated Australia at top table of diplomacy
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 25 September 2021
The story this week was not France but China. While the media cycle was dominated by French fury, history was being made in Washington with the emergence of two strategic entities that will shape the Indo-Pacific their purpose being to constrain ...
The story this week was not France but China. While the media cycle was dominated by French fury, history was being made in Washington with the emergence of two strategic entities that will shape the Indo-Pacific their purpose being to constrain ...
 
 
Caution: submarines. Approach with great care
Brisbane Times (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 24 September 2021
Politics Federal Royal Australian Navy The diplomatic fallout from an old ally in Europe following Australia’s ...
nation find itself without a working submarine at all. On April 25, 1915, a little Australian submarine called the AE2, having dived beneath
 
 
Australia ‘can’t simply wait’ to acquire nuclear submarines
Sky News Australia (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 24 September 2021
Liberal MP Andrew Wallace says Australia “can’t simply wait” to acquire nuclear submarines which were announced as part of the AUKUS ...
to get them a lot sooner. “That’s not to suggest that our existing Collins class submarines are not capable, they are absolutely capable.”
 
 
British Royal Navy commissions Astute-class submarine HMS Audacious
Naval Technology - 24 September 2021
The commissioning ceremony was held at the UK’s HM Naval Base Clyde.
land attack cruise missiles (TLAM) and Spearfish heavyweight torpedoes. Royal Navy Submarine Service head commodore Jim Perks said: “This
 
 
Underwater costs: Australia’s move to nuclear submarines
ABC Radio National - 24 September 2021
 
Worth a listen: Australia's move to acquire nuclear-powered submarines and the scrapping its $90 billion submarine program with France has had diplomatic consequences – but what can be assumed about the costs, timeframes and local involvement? Plus, shipping costs, stock delays and supply chain stresses as the pandemic continues.
 
 
Nuclear submarines increase Australia’s need for speed
The Strategist - 24 September 2021
The world’s gotten more dangerous—and quickly. And while nuclear submarines from the new AUKUS partnership will give Australia a powerful ...
‘ecosystem’ and careful, extended processes make absolute sense. Nuclear submarines are an iconic example. It’s absolutely right to take
 
 
What you need to know about Australia's new submarines
Brisbane Times (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 24 September 2021
Under the new AUKUS deal, Australia will be acquiring nuclear-powered submarines. Here's what you need to know ...
National Under the new AUKUS deal, Australia will be acquiring nuclear-powered submarines. Here's what you need to know about the powerful
 
 
Could the French go nuclear for us?
On Line Opinion - 24 September 2021
Militarily Australia has few offensive weapons. Our primary offensive weapon is our submarine fleet. It is our only weapon that presently ...
. The replacement to the Collins Class Diesel submarines was to be a diesel-electric submarine with an ability to mimic nuclear units with
 
 
Build our nuclear submarines in America, not Adelaide
The Canberra Times (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 24 September 2021
USS Hawaii, a Virginia-class United States submarine, makes her way to berth at Diamantina Pier, HMAS Stirling, ...
Build our nuclear submarines in America, not Adelaide
 
 
Europe’s Indo-Pacific future goes deeper than French subs
The Strategist - 24 September 2021
The AUKUS defence and security pact among Australia, the United Kingdom and United States has clearly sunk French, and associated European ...
US ambassadors in response to the AUKUS announcement of a nuclear-powered submarine program that spelled the end of French shipbuilder Naval
 
 
Gilday: Australian sub deal ‘brilliant,’ partnership with French Navy remains strong
Navy Times - 24 September 2021
WASHINGTON — The U.S. Navy’s chief of naval operations is committed to helping Australia with its newly announced nuclear-powered submarine ...
previously planned to replace its 1990s-built Collins-class attack submarines with a French diesel-electric submarine, in a deal worth $66
 
 
Labor needs to ‘make a decision’ on submarine deal | The Australian
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 24 September 2021
Adoni Media’s Leisa Goddard says the Labor Party has to make a decision one way or the other regarding the AUKUS alliance and the acquisition of nuclear-powered submarines. The Australian is reporting Prime Minister Scott Morrison has accused the ...
Adoni Media’s Leisa Goddard says the Labor Party has to make a decision one way or the other regarding the AUKUS alliance and the acquisition of nuclear-powered submarines. The Australian is reporting Prime Minister Scott Morrison has accused the ...
 
 
Aukus: Australia sent ‘extremely satisfied’ letter hours before axing French contract
The Guardian - 23 September 2021
French Naval Group to invoice Australia for abruptly cancelling submarine contract, says CEO
a statement saying ministers from both sides “underlined the importance of the future submarine program”. Morrison said: “I look forward to
 
 
US Congress backs AUKUS nuclear submarine deal | The Australian
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 23 September 2021
Prime Minister Scott Morrison has met with United States Congress leaders, including Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who support the AUKUS nuclear submarines plan. Mr Morrison is in the United States meeting with leaders of the Quad following the historic ...
Prime Minister Scott Morrison has met with United States Congress leaders, including Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who support the AUKUS nuclear submarines plan. Mr Morrison is in the United States meeting with leaders of the Quad following the historic ...
 
 
$1m donation expands Australia’s only nuclear engineering program
Defence Connect - 23 September 2021
The Sir William Tyree Foundation has made a $1 million donation to support UNSW’s expanding nuclear engineering program and foster the ...
between Australia, the UK and the US, which will see nuclear-powered submarines built in South Australia as part of a knowledge sharing
 
 
Which submarine will Australia build?
Australian Defence Magazine - 23 September 2021
Now it’s been decided that the RAN is to acquire a fleet of nuclear-powered hunter-killer submarines (SSNs), the question is – which ...
Now it’s been decided that the RAN is to acquire a fleet of nuclear-powered hunter-killer submarines (SSNs), the question is – which one?
 
 
The hidden cost of the Attack-class submarine cancellation
The Strategist - 23 September 2021
The abrupt announcement last week by the Australian government that it was scrapping its plans to build a fleet of diesel-electric ...
market by another 30%. With the Attack-class submarine program failing to survive a change in government leadership, how much confidence
 
 
The Detail: What Australia's nuclear submarine deal means for New Zealand
Stuff.co.nz - 23 September 2021
 
 
 
 
STOP PRESS | Subs would have been as obsolete as the Otway
Central Western Daily (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 22 September 2021
The federal government has joined the USA and the UK in a landmark deal that will cost us $90 billion for nuclear ...
-good half submarine in the southern NSW town that could be restored. A periscope and control room has also been installed at the submarine,
 
 
Why are Australia’s subs going nuclear? | The Australian
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 22 September 2021
The Australian Navy's next submarine fleet will be nuclear-powered, with many factors involved in the decision, here's a look at the strategic advantages.
The Australian Navy's next submarine fleet will be nuclear-powered, with many factors involved in the decision, here's a look at the strategic advantages.
 
 
Thales Updates Status After Australia’s Submarine Program Change
SeaWaves - 22 September 2021
Thales takes note of the decision by the Australian authorities to acquire a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines in the framework of a new ...
longer proceed with the AFS (Australian Future Submarine) program to build new generation conventional submarines. From a financial point
 
 
Collins class submarine builder ASC in line to build nuclear-powered boats in Adelaide
Herald Sun (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 22 September 2021
The Adelaide shipbuilder once derided as unfit to build a canoe is a frontrunner to build at least eight nuclear- ...
British nuclear submarine agreement. Picture Kelly Barnes ASC, previously the Australian Submarine Corporation, built the six Collins-class
 
 
Australia-France submarine deal could take three years to terminate
The Sydney Morning Herald (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 22 September 2021
Australia could take up to three years to formally break away from the $90 billion submarine agreement with France ...
to back Australia’s move to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines. The future submarine deal with France could take three years to
 
 
Newport News Shipbuilding will likely see a boost from Australian deal, analysts say"
Daily Press - 22 September 2021
The diplomatic firestorm over Australia’s plan to acquire U.S. or British nuclear submarine technology will likely give a boost to Newport ...
past struggled to find enough sailors to operate all of its Collins-class submarines, as it dealt with problems with the propulsion system,
 
 
The sub story no one wants to hear
Defence Connect - 22 September 2021
It’s the sub story no one wants to hear – the coming end of the submarine era. But we must expect it, writes Roger Bradbury, emeritus ...
generation of nuclear-armed submarines become deployed through the 2030s and beyond. Our analysis identified broad areas of future science
 
 
Australia's submarines make waves in Asia long before they go to sea
The Straits Times - 22 September 2021
BEIJING - China is swelling into a military superpower. India, Vietnam and Singapore are spending more on defence.
arms race, which the region does not need now, nor in the future." The submarines will not hit the water for at least a decade. But the
 
 
$1m gift to UNSW boosts nuclear studies
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 22 September 2021
UNSW will expand its nuclear engineering course with the aid of a 1m philanthropic gift, as demand builds for high-level nuclear expertise to operate and maintain Australias planned fleet of nuclear submarines.
UNSW will expand its nuclear engineering course with the aid of a 1m philanthropic gift, as demand builds for high-level nuclear expertise to operate and maintain Australias planned fleet of nuclear submarines.
 
 
Australian documents showed French submarine project was at risk for years
Business Mayor - 21 September 2021
/**/ /**/ /**/ (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); /**/ By Kirsty Needham SYDNEY (Reuters) – France shouldn’t have been ...
“very clear that the decision was not a result of difficulties with the Future Submarine Program or Naval Group”. “Naval Group delivered on
 
 
Limiting the nuclear-proliferation blowback from the AUKUS submarine deal
The Strategist - 21 September 2021
If the architects of the AUKUS pact and its headline initiative to supply Australia with nuclear-powered submarines imagined it would be ...
a special Brazil–Argentina nuclear non-proliferation agreement , Brazil has been developing nuclear-powered submarines with France, which
 
 
Britain’s nuclear submarines to use Australia as base for Indo-Pacific presence
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 21 September 2021
Britains nuclear-powered submarines are to use Australia as a base so that they can have a more persistent presence in the Indo-Pacific region under plans discussed by ministers.
Britains nuclear-powered submarines are to use Australia as a base so that they can have a more persistent presence in the Indo-Pacific region under plans discussed by ministers.
 
 
How to buy a submarine (2021 edition)
The Strategist - 21 September 2021
I’ll admit to being surprised when Australia announced the termination of the deal with Naval Group to build the Attack-class submarines. ...
couple of cracks at pitching a way ahead for the acquisition of the future submarines, with Sean Costello in 2009 , and with Mark Thomson
 
 
Price rejects claim that WA will lose billions in full-cycle docking decision
Defence Connect - 21 September 2021
Minister for Defence Industry Melissa Price rejected claims that WA would lose billions a year due to the government’s decision to keep the ...
would pursue the development of nuclear-powered submarines, cancelling the contract with Naval Group for the Attack Class submarine. As a
 
 
As the world reorders itself to resist China, it’s a pity the latest move was so boofheaded
Brisbane Times (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 21 September 2021
World Asia National security When Xi Jinping took leadership of the Chinese Communist Party in 2012, he promised ...
Australia’s existing six submarines. How? Because the six Collins class subs that will constitute Australia’s only submarine capability for
 
 
Submarines are great force multipliers; are eight enough?
The Canberra Times (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 21 September 2021
Has Scott Morrison done the right thing by placing such great importance on the US alliance? Picture: Sitthixay ...
the French. How ironic this impasse is about nuclear submarines. Many remember the French nuclear tests at Mururoa Atoll from 1966 to 1996,
 
 
Collateral damage mars Australia's submarine deal
The Canberra Times (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 21 September 2021
The decision to go nuclear with the replacement for Australia's ageing Collins-class submarines has had many ...
The decision to go nuclear with the replacement for Australia's ageing Collins-class submarines has had many unintended consequences.
 
 
Defence quashes Barracuda claims
Defence Connect - 21 September 2021
Naval Group’s Barracuda Class submarines were not a viable nuclear-powered submarine alternative for the Royal Australian Navy, according ...
12 diesel-powered Attack Class submarines to replace the ageing Collins Class fleet as part of its $90 billion SEA 1000 project. The
 
 
Everybody Wins If Australia Gets “New” Los Angeles Class Subs ASAP
Forbes - 21 September 2021
Defense links between the AUKUS “Three Amigos” partnership of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States will advance faster than ...
Los Angeles Class submarines also opens new options for Australia’s aging conventionally powered fleet of six Collins Class submarines.
 
 
Nuclear-powered subs are a ‘very good long-term plan’ | The Australian
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 20 September 2021
Liberal Senator Jim Molan says the nuclear-powered submarines which will be acquired under the AUKUS alliance are a very good long-term plan but do not solve Australia's immediate defence issues amid the growing threat posed by China. “My deep concern ...
Liberal Senator Jim Molan says the nuclear-powered submarines which will be acquired under the AUKUS alliance are a very good long-term plan but do not solve Australia's immediate defence issues amid the growing threat posed by China. “My deep concern .
 
 
Former subs boss blasts 'hocus pocus' nuclear deal
InDaily - 20 September 2021
A former head of ASC has blasted Australia’s “insane deal” with the US and the UK to build nuclear-powered submarines in Adelaide, deriding ...
nor conventional submarine – but not before a meaningful, highly capable submarine replacement program is in place for the Collins Class,”
 
 
When you’re in a hole, stop digging: Australia and the nuke sub deal
Lowy Institute for International Policy - 20 September 2021
By the time Canberra’s subs roll off the dock, their capabilities will be obsolete, and there are bigger threats, too.
to stop digging. If only Australia understood this wisdom. Abandoning the French submarine project , the government has decided to double
 
 
Naval Group’s Statement on Australia’s Withdrawal from French-Designed Submarine Deal
Al Defaiya - 20 September 2021
Naval Group said in statement that it took note of the decision of the Australian authorities to acquire a fleet of nuclear submarines in ...
the race.File Photo © Naval Group: On 11 February 2019, the Future Submarine Program Strategic Partnering Agreement (SPA) was signed by the
 

 


Peter Smith has excelled himself in his column and quite interesting.
 

PLATYPUS II by Peter SMITH

    In the early 1920s an ex Royal Victorian Ship was made available for service as a submarine tender at Corio Bay, Geelong. The following story is a short history of that vessel.
    The enactment in 1865 of the Colonial Naval Defence Act by the British Parliament gave full legal authority to the colonial naval activities, which was exploited by the Treasurer of the Government of Victoria Gordon Verdon.
    During his visit to England in 1866 Verdon asked for an iron-plated ship and wooden training vessel to be maintained by the Victorian colony for its emergent naval force.
    Verdon succeeded with his request and the Admiralty were instructed by the British Cabinet to arrange the building of a monitor at a cost of 125,000 Pounds, of which Victoria was to supply the armament and 25,000 Pounds towards the costs. Included in the deal, a graving dock modified to take the largest man-of-war.
    In the agreement, Victoria was obliged to pay all maintenance and manning costs, including engaging their own volunteers. It was recognized that in the time of war, the ship would be placed under the command of the senior Royal Naval officer on the Australia Station, and that, if justified, he could take that ship outside of the colony’s waters.
    Later the second part of the accord was denied and instead of a disagreement the conditions were abandoned. Members of the British Admiralty were upset at the changes, in private they felt their government had made a gift of 100,000 Pounds to Victoria.
    Work began on a monitor at Palmers Yard, Plymouth, in 1867 with the keel being laid on September 1. The armoured turret monitor was considered an ultra-modern warship of 3,340 tons when launched in 1868. With a length of 225 feet (69metres) and fitted with Maudsley, Son and Field machinery with twin screws capable of a speed of 9 knots, included were bunkers for 240 tons of coal. The monitor carried 4 inch armour plate and was armed with four 18-ton muzzle loading rifled guns with 10 inch bore throwing a shot weighing 400 pounds. Also included were two 6 pounder quick firing guns, plus four Nordenfelt 4 barrel 1-inch machine guns. Monitors were designed to be partially submerged by flooding of several compartments, which left only the turret and breastwork above water. Ventilators were included to allow free air flow throughout the ship.
    Lieutenant Panter RN left Melbourne in April 1870 arriving in England in June to take command of HMVS Cerberus.
    The fitting out of the monitor was completed at Chatham. While on passage from Chatham back to Plymouth on 29 October 1870 Cerberus passed through a severe gale. Officers at the Admiralty became quite concerned of her seaworthiness, as a similar vessel HMS Captain was lost in a storm. Lieutenant Panter later reported that “The ship sailed like a half tide rock” and it was no wonder the crew promptly deserted when the ship arrived at Plymouth.
    On arrival in Port Phillip on 9 April 1871 Cerberus, having made her maiden voyage via the newly opened Suez Canal was considered to be the most powerful warship in the Southern Hemisphere. After her arrival the monitor never passed through the heads to or from Port Phillip again.
    During the many war scares, Cerberus never saw action; however, her aggressive power and armament provided a sense of protection for the people of Victoria. The only casualties during the monitor’s commission was in 1879 when an officer and four seamen were killed after an accidental explosion during mining exercises at Queenscliff.
    In 1905 when the Australian Naval Board was formed, Captain William R. Creswell the appointed Director of the Naval Forces, proposed that when Victoria’s naval vessels are incorporated into the Royal Australian Navy, Cerberus should be withdrawn from active commission and be used as a depot ship for torpedo boats stationed in Port Phillip.
    When war was declared in 1914, the monitor with its major guns inoperative had outlived its usefulness as a seagoing vessel, but it continued to function as a depot ship and in its original port guard duties at Williamstown.
    After the war Cerberus was used as an explosives store ship and on 13 March 1921 a new duty was bestowed on her. On 3 June 1921 the monitor was converted for use as a submarine tender and was towed by HMAS Platypus from Hobsons Bay to Corio Bay, Geelong, to augment the facilities at Osborne House, the submarine base for the ‘J’ class submarines. A proposal to recommission the hulk with Lieutenant Commander O.E. Hallifax RN in command was rejected by the Australian Naval Board. Renamed Platypus II she served the submarine flotilla until the submarines were moved from Geelong in the early months of 1922 to Hanns Inlet at Flinders Naval Depot. Cerberus was towed back to Hobsons Bay where she was moored near the dockyard at Williamstown.
    Sold to the Melbourne Salvage Syndicate on 14 May 1924 for 409 Pounds, Cerberus was stripped of her fittings by November 1925.
    On September 1926, Cerberus was towed to and ran aground off Black Rock in Port Phillip, where the hulk is still being used as a breakwater today
    In recent years there have been moves a-foot to salvage the hulk and put her on display away from the water, however time, storm damage and saltwater have made their mark for corrosion has eaten through her keel and the ship is slowly crumbling into herself.

Cerberus moored in Hobsons Bay off Williamstown circa 1924-25. 

 
To the readers of the Coxswain’s Grot.
Lately, there has been a fair amount of information in the electronic media on shingles, and the various government departments are pushing elderly listeners who have had chicken pox to get vaccinated to prevent the disease from occurring. The following is my own experience of the disease.
Back in 2018, my partner and I were not in attendance at the NSW Branch AGM and the spreading of Norman Williams OAM ashes at the Platypus site. I did send my apologies that I could not make it for medical reasons, I am unaware if the members were told the reasons why.
I was at the early stages of shingles, the disease decided to attack the right side of my face. Having seen my GP and an eye specialist I was pumped up on doses of medication and antibiotics to stop the virus from doing damage to my right eye and other areas of my face and brain. I was warned off from shaving to stop damaging the blisters forming on my face that could scar, and if all went well, I should recover in two to three weeks with no aftereffects. I did not attend because the disease was attacking nerve points giving headaches and pain, between that and drugs, all I wanted to do was to sleep and I must stress I was not contagious. So, at that time I looked the perfect mangy, hairy seadog.
Well enough of me! Shingles is inflammation along the course of the sensory nerves leading out from the spine, characterised by great pain and crops of small blisters. The medical term for the disease is herpes zoster and is closely related or perhaps identical to the chicken pox (varicella) virus. Once a child has had chicken pox and the rash heals the varicella virus hides away in the nerve cells. (My GP tells me that it does this in the vertebra of the spine.) For anyone who had chicken pox this shitty virus will reappear any time as shingles and this time it brings with it pain (oh, lots of pain) and it can persist for months and depending where you are afflicted the muscles can also remain very weak.
So, from all the pain and weakness that I suffered to all you people who have had chicken pox, I recommend that you see your doctor and get the antiviral vaccine against shingles as you have the virus in your system, and it can flare up at any time. I will be going for mine again shortly as I have been told I could have another flare up at any time after this last bout.
Please take heed of my warning, we are senior citizens, and we don’t need this crap as we age, get the shingles shot. 
Regards Peter Smith, AKA Smudge.
             
This really did make me feel better!
 
 
 

 

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely
in a pretty and well preserved body,
but rather to skid in broadside thoroughly used up,
totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming,
WOW!  WHAT A RIDE!-

Onya Smudge, not quite there myself

 IN MEMORIUM

VALE Aurealia NOAKES
May be an image of 2 people, including Tony Noakes and beard
Most have been notified by social media however this is a very emotive time for Tony. Not only has he had to deal with the passing of his Sole Mate and Partner of fifteen years but, has had to deal with this along with testing positive to COVID and frustration  with Filipino restriction whilst in isolation for fourteen days. In some small measure, he can take heart from the amount of respect and condolences from the Submarine Community who support and love him.
RIP Aurealia

Snowy Ross Ashes remain with his brother in Northern NSW and awaiting COVID restrictions and Family capacity to finally lay him to rest next to the love of his life. Let us hope that it in the not too distant future. Pondering that he is at his final port of call, the bar would be clear and the tooheys old keg would be empty as his beloved Rabbitoh’s lost last Sunday. You don’t want to be around a pissed off Snowy which they have learnt upstairs.

FROM THE RECTORY

Pretty well speak to the Bishop (Frank) weekly and keep him informed of what's going on in our Community. I did not mention the following photo:





 The face in the picture shows a proud and humble man (and a Greenie to boot) and is the same person that serves the greater Murray Region as their Bishop and the Submarine Family with compassion, strength and love. What an asset we have in a Beach Ball Bishop previously a rotund Reverend and before a pear shape POLTO.
Something from Jeff Stein which is quite emotive. Was saving it for Remembrance Day but whatthe hell:
(Tim insert Jeff’s one forwarded on 26 Jul at 2120)



SICK PARADE

 
From West to East Coast
 
Great news on Bob Trotter and an article and report from Bob Mummery a Family friend and through Dave Strangward:
 

From: Strangward, David MR
Sent: Tuesday, October 5, 2021 8:10:07 AM
Subject: FW: BOB TROTTER IMPROVING

Seems Bob is up and about with a comment in the WA paper, great to see

 

David Strangward



 

 
Ray Kemp still doing it tough with his leg. Stubborn bugger in and out of hospital but still devotes his time to his TPI work and thinks about others rather than himself.
Contacted Bob O’Grady and is still undergoing Chemo and he seems o be in fine spirits despite his circumstances with the poxy beast upon him.
Same goes for Ian Prodger and his throat problem he is near on impossible to talk to (obviously) but hoping that ongoing treatment will bring a positive outcome.

 

DVA MATTERS

Some interesting and informative topics for your perusal
 

 

The MESHA Guide 2021

Here is an extract from the guide. Click on the picture for a full copy.
 
 

Subject: For Information: Accessing your COVID vaccination certificate [SEC=OFFICIAL]
 
 
Dear colleagues
 
Vaccinations are currently top of everyone’s mind. They are the best way to protect ourselves and our community and, not surprisingly, veterans have been asking for information about how to get a COVID vaccination and about how to access their vaccination certificate. The information below should answer most of their questions so, please, share this with your members and networks.
 
Booking your vaccination
 
The simplest way to check your eligibility and book a vaccination is through the Department of Health’s COVID-19 Vaccination page.
 
Getting your vaccination certificate
 
Once you’ve had the jab, there are a few ways that you can get your vaccination certificate. The simplest way is to ask your vaccination provider to print a copy for you.
 
Alternatively, you can phone the Australian Immunisation Register (AIR). Call their dedicated Veteran and Defence Support Line on 1800 653 809, select Option 4 and the helpful hotline staff can mail you a copy of your certificate.
 
The AIR Veteran and Defence Support Line can also help you check if you already have a Medicare number. Many veterans do have a Medicare number but aren’t aware of it, so it is worth checking.
 
If you have a Medicare number, you can access your digital COVID vaccine certificate through myGov and via the Express Plus Medicare app on your mobile phone. There are some easy-to-follow instructions available on the ‘How to get proof of your COVID-19 vaccinations’ page of the Services Australia website.
 
If you are a DVA card holder and do not have a Medicare number, you will need to access your My Health Record and link it to your myGov account. The Australian Digital Health Agency has a help line on 1800 723 471 (24 hours, 7 days a week). They will verify your identity and give you an access code (also called an Identity Verification Code) to link your My Health Record and MyGov account. This way, you will be able to get a digital copy of your vaccination certificate via MyGov.
 
Further information
 
We have gathered the answers to the many COVID questions we’ve received from you and answered them on our ‘COVID vaccination roll-out FAQ’ page. However, if you have any specific concerns you should talk to your trusted GP.
 
Kind regards,
 
Dr Trish Batchelor
Deputy Chief Health Officer
Department of Veterans’ Affairs

Subject: a mistake has happened
 Hi all,
 If you receive a letter from DVA saying that they have either and or reduced your pension and have taken your Gold Card, it is a mistake on their behalf, someone pushed the wrong button, file the letter is the bin or send it back to them asking for an explanation.


https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-09-25/low-mortality-rate-astrazeneca-covid-vaccine-clots-tts/100489408?utm_campaign=abc_news_web&utm_content=mail&utm_medium=content_shared&utm_source=abc_news_web
 
Important Lessons for Life....... 
 
 
MAYBE WE SHOULD READ THIS EVERY MORNING ...
Of a war that he once fought in
And the deeds that he had done,
In his exploits with his mates;
They were heroes, every one.

 
And 'tho sometimes to his neighbours
His tales became a joke,
All his mates listened quietly
For they knew where of he spoke.

 
But we'll hear his tales no longer,
For ol' Jack has passed away,
And the world's a little poorer
For a Digger died today.

 
He won't be mourned by many,
Just his children and his wife.
For he lived an ordinary,
Very quiet sort of life.

 
He held a job and raised a family,
Going quietly on his way;
And the world won't note his passing,
'Tho a Digger died today.

 
When politicians leave this earth,
Their bodies lie in state,
While thousands note their passing,
And proclaim that they were great.

 
The Media tell of their life stories
From the time that they were young,
But the passing of a Digger
Goes unnoticed, and unsung.

 
Is the greatest contribution
To the welfare of our land,
Some smoothie who breaks his promise
And cons his fellow man?

 
Or the ordinary fellow
Who in times of war and strife,
Goes off to serve his country,
And offers up his life?

 
The politician's stipend
And the style in which they live,
Are often disproportionate,
To the service that they give.

 
While the ordinary Digger,
Who offered up his all,
Is paid off with a medal
And perhaps a pension, small.

 
It is not the politicians
With their compromise and ploys,
Who won for us the freedom
That our country now enjoys.

 
Should you find yourself in danger,
With your enemies at hand,
Would you really want some cop-out,
With his ever-waffling stand?

 
Or would you want a Digger
His home, his country, his kin,
Just a common Digger,
Who would fight until the end?

 
He was just a common Digger,
And his ranks are growing thin,
But his presence should remind us
We may need his likes agin.

 
For when countries are in conflict,
We find the Digger's part,
Is to clean up all the troubles
That the politicians start.

 
If we cannot do him honour
While he's here to hear the praise,
Then at least let's give him homage
At the ending of his days.

 
Perhaps just a simple headline
In the paper that might say:

"OUR COUNTRY IS IN MOURNING,
A DIGGER DIED TODAY."
 
He was getting old and paunchy
And his hair was falling fast,
And he sat around the R.S.L.,
Telling stories of the past.
 
If you are proud of our Armed Forces, then send it to ALL your friends 
You'll be glad you did.


       
  
  



  
  
  
  
  







  
  
  

  
  
  



  
  



  
  
  


  
  
  








 
Candid Video from a Wardroom near you 

HMAS OTAMA

 
The following received from Parks Victoria to Stakeholders involved in transition phase of the Boat being removed from the care (or lack of) of its present custodian.
 
George Bass Coastal Walk

Stakeholder update 

Ex HMAS Otama - Western Port
September 2021
 
 

The situation 

 
 
The privately owned Ex-HMAS Otama (Otama or vessel) has been moored at Western Port near Crib Point for almost 20 years.   Having sat on a slight tilt for some time, this increased significantly following overnight storms on 10 and 11 June 2021. The heavily corroded ballast and fuel tanks on the starboard side took on water causing the vessel to list.  
Immediate action was taken by authorities to stabilise the listing vessel to minimise the risk of it sinking.  This included temporarily sealing hatches and holes, attaching buoyancy and counterweights, and pumping out water.  A 200 metre exclusion zone was established for the safety of other boat users in the area.  
On 30 June 2021, the Otama was returned to a vertical position. The righted position was maintained by intermittent pumping and ongoing monitoring. 
On 4 September 2021, the vessel was relocated to suitable shallower water and  temporarily moored just offshore from Crib Point, remaining within in local port waters managed by Parks Victoria.   Using specially designed tackle to keep it stationary, this will significantly reduce the risk of the Otama sinking in deep water while the future of the vessel is considered.  A 200 metre exclusion zone also applies at the new location.  
A multi-agency effort between the State (Parks Victoria, Ports Victoria, Maritime Safety Victoria, Environmental Protection Authority, Port of Hastings Development Authority, Port of Hastings Harbour Master), with advice from the Federal Government (Department of Defence), coordinated through the Department of Transport, has been needed to manage the complex issue presented by the deteriorating vessel.
 
 
The vessel listed up to 43 degrees after taking on water on the starboard side following the June storms.  Image:  Parks Victoria
 
 
Through the efforts of Parks Victoria and the Port of Hastings Development Authority, the vessel was stabilised and righted, and maintained through ongoing monitoring and pumping out of water.        Image: Port of Hastings Development Authority
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Otama was towed by tugs to a shallow water mooring nearshore of Crib Point on 4 September 2021. Image:  Parks Victoria
 
 

Protecting the environment

 
 
Western Port is home to three Marine National Parks (Churchill, French Island and Yaringa).  The wetlands of Western Port’s shoreline are listed as Wetlands of International Importance under the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands, recognising it as one of the world’s most valuable sites for international migratory wader birds.   
Precautions are being taken to ensure the vessel's obvious deterioration and poor condition does not impact the marine environment. This includes regular monitoring, identifying risks and undertaking mitigation actions.  So far any significant damage has been avoided.  With the vessel moved to a shallow mooring and secured with specially designed tackle to keep it stationary, the risk of sinking and releasing potentially hazardous materials into the water is reduced significantly.  
 
 
 
 

The future

 
 
The future of the vessel currently lies with the vessel owners, the Western Port Oberon Association.  
The vessel condition has deteriorated over time to a very fragile state and now requires constant inspection and pumping out of water which is unsustainable.  The Victorian Government has already invested significantly into the Otama, both in funding replacement of mooring tackle and now with the recent stabilisation and relocation efforts.  It is unable to remain in Western Port as it presents a real risk to the environment and navigation hazard.  
The owners were advised of Parks Victoria’s intentions to move the vessel to shallow water and has subsequently been issued with a Direction to Move notice under the Port Management Act 1995.
The Victorian Government will continue to work with the Association towards an outcome that is in the best interests of the broader community and the environment.    
 
 

A little bit of history

 
 
The Otama was an Oberon-class submarine of the Royal Australian Navy constructed in the early 1970s, then launched on 3 December 1975 by HRH Princess Anne and commissioned on 27 April 1978 under the command of Lieutenant Commander F.V.R. Wolfe RAN.   It performed classified operations and coastal surveillance before being decommissioned in December 2000. 
In 2001 the Commonwealth sold the Otama to the Western Port Oberon Association (Association). The Association planned to preserve the vessel as a museum display at the then proposed Victorian Maritime Centre. The Association received a $500,000 Centenary of Federation grant from the federal government to fund the sale and relocation from Fremantle in Perth to Western Port and support the museum proposal. 
The Otama arrived and was moored in Western Port in 2002, while waiting for the approval and development of the museum.  Plans to realise an Otama submarine experience have been unsuccessful to date.  
Australia is home to three other surviving Oberon class submarines including the Otama’s sister ship, the HMAS Ovens in Fremantle as well as HMAS Onslow in Sydney and HMAS Otway at Hollbrook, New South Wales. 
 
 
 
 
The Otama at sea.  Circa unknown. Image: from Flickr
 
 
Further information
For further information about the Otama's stabilisation and relocation effort call Parks Victoria on 13 1963 or send an email to info@parks.vic.gov.au 
Enquiries about the Otama’s future should be directed to the Western Port Oberon Association
 
 
   
Parks Victoria, Level 10, 535 Bourke St, Melbourne VIC 3000 Australia
Contact 13 19 63, engage@parks.vic.gov.au
 
 
Who said Rabbits aren't scary
God only knows what will happen next? The Western Port Harbor Master keeps me informed but nothing heard as of yesterday. She lies in 2M of water under the keel and given the current COVID spike in Victoria and inclement weather conditions will negate any removal of the boat if deemed so.
 
PROJECT TOUCHSTONE
 
Gaining momentum and well supported by the SAA. National Exec have forwarded an appropriate letter to the Chairman of the Project RADM PD Briggs (Ran ret and more honours  and awards you can poke a stick at). Hopefully, and with the assistance of Mike Bennett have provided UK Submarine Community with sufficient information to get their full support. The Project is significant in not only does it preserve artifacts but for display in Australia and UK for generations to come which in turn, is history in its progress and final result.
 
I bring to your attention the following published in UK:
 
 
AE1 & AE2. G'Day Terry, As you will recall the RAN lost two boats during WW1 that being AE1 and AE2. AE2, was commanded by Lt Henry Stoker, RN with a crew of 35 submariners. AE2 was the first Allied submarine to navigate the Dardanelles into the Sea of Marmara on the day of the Anzac landings at Gallipoli. It was sunk on 30 Apr 1915. The boat was surveyed by a team led by Rr Adm Peter Biggs RAN (retd) and is now classified as an historic wreck, under the protection of the Turkish Government. AE1 (sister boat to AE2) w was the first submarine to serve in the RAN and was lost at sea with all hands near what is now East New Britain, Papua New Guinea, on 14 Sept, 1914, after less than seven months in service. Over recent years extensive marine archaeology searches have taken place (funded in part by Australian submarine community and Government grants) and she was eventually located. Once again, the driving force of the operation included Peter Briggs. Having been located, photographed, and declared a Commonwealth War Grave Site (with exact location kept secret to deter scavengers) attempts are now being made to recover some items from the AE1 for preservation and display in the Australian National War Memorial in Canberra and (possibly) the Submarine Museum in Gosport. AE1 and AE2 were both designed and built in Barrow-in-Furness by Vickers, were to the greater part manned by RN submariners (either on secondment to the RAN or after transfer) all the crews were trained by the RN, doing their Part III training on HM Submarines. Peter Briggs has penned a submission, and I have put together an introduction, seeking support from the Submariner Community to assist in this cause? Would you be able to include the article in the Derbyshire Submariners Trade Journal? I will be asking other submarine outlets and I of course will also be including it in PPP. (Port Philips Papers). It would be wonderful if we could get the appeal brought to the attention of the wider submarine community, as I know you will agree. Cheers M8 Mike B His Majesty’s Australian Submarine AE1 AE1 was launched in the yard of Vickers Ltd at Barrow-in-Furness, England on 22 May 1913. She commissioned at Portsmouth on 28 Feb 1914 under the command of Lt Cdr Thomas Fleming Besant, RN. She was the first of two E Class submarines built for the fledgling RAN, and was manned by RN officers with a mixed crew of sailors drawn from the RN and the RAN Accompanied by her sister AE2, under the command of Lieutenant Commander Henry Stoker, RN, AE1 departed England in March 1914, transited the Suez Canal, and reached Sydney on 24 May 1914. Although the submarines remained surfaced for almost all of the delivery voyage it was at the time the longest transit distance ever travelled by a submarine. At the outbreak of World War I, AE1 joined the naval forces assigned to the capture of the German Pacific colonies. With AE2, she took part in the operations leading to the occupation of German New Guinea, including the surrender of Rabaul on 13 Sept 1914. The following day, at 7am the destroyer HMAS Parramatta left her night patrol ground off Raluana Point and proceeded at slow speed in the direction of Cape Gazelle to rendezvous with AE1 and conduct a patrol in St George’s Channel to the south and east of the Duke of York Islands. The two vessels met off Herbertshohe at 8am and exchanged signals before proceeding to Cape Gazelle where they arrived at approximately 9am. A further exchange of signals followed during which Parramatta advised AE1 that her ‘Orders were to search to the south’ard with submarine and anchor off Herbertshohe at 5:30pm.’ Parramatta then proceeded independently in a southerly direction while AE1 advanced in a north-easterly direction. The weather was hazy, and visibility was observed to be between 9 and 10 nm’s, at times decreasing to 5 miles. Parramatta reported that AE1 was obscured by the haze for some time, as was the nearest land. Given these conditions, Parramatta’s CO, Lt William Warren, RAN, considered it advisable not to lose sight of the submarine for too long. At 12:30 Parramatta turned to the northwest and by 2:30 she was close to AE1 when the submarine asked by signal: ‘What is the distance of visibility?’ Parramatta responded: ‘About 5 miles’. At 3:20 the submarine was lost sight of and Parramatta altered course and steamed in the direction she was last seen. No sign of AE1 was found and it was considered that she must have steamed back to harbour without informing Parramatta. Consequently, Parramatta proceeded to the north-west and rounded Duke of York Island before heading to Credner Island, later anchoring off Herbertshohe at 7pm. By 8:00pm the submarine had not returned, and Parramatta and her sister ship HMAS Yarra were ordered to search for the submarine. The light cruiser HMAS Sydney, on her way to the west coast, also received instructions to keep a lookout and later HMA Ships Encounter, and Warrego also joined the search together with launches from Rabaul and Herbertshohe. No trace of AE1 was found, not even the tell-tale shimmer of escaping oil floating on the surface of the water. Project Touchstone AE1 - Conserving AE1 Artefacts for Future Generations The team which led the successful search for HMAS AE1 are developing Project Touchstone AE1, to recover and conserve selected, emblematic artefact, something easily recognisable and associated with 14 AE1. This will improve current and future generations’ access to the story of AE1, preserve them from loss to the sea or trophy hunters and provide the centre piece ‘touchstone’ of a future commemorative display in the Australian War memorial in Canberra. Project Touchstone AE1 has the endorsement of the RAN’s Chief of Navy, subject to appropriate stakeholder agreement of a detailed wreck management plan outlining the future management of the wreck and the recovery of the item if practical. The Project is at the Concept Development Phase, as we identify a specific artefact for recovery, start discussions with subsea engineering companies operating in Australia/Papua New Guinea (PNG) to develop an understanding of the techniques and budget required. This document is intended to provide early advice of the Project to potential stake holders and interest groups, prior to publicly launching the Project, to give these groups an opportunity to voice their response to the proposed recovery operations. We wish to explain what is intended and address any concerns these groups may have. Any recovery will be conducted in accordance with the UNESCO 2001 Underwater Heritage Convention and overseen by experienced maritime archaeologists, Mr Tim Smith OAM, Director of Heritage Operations, NSW Office of Environment & Heritage and Dr James Hunter, RAN Curator at the Australian National Maritime Museum (both involved in previous AE1 and AE2 programmes). Work is in hand to have the Project agreed by the Australian War Memorial, RAN and Australian National Maritime Museum and approved by the Australian and PNG Governments. It will be conducted in accordance with an AE1 Heritage Management Plan being developed by the Department of Agriculture, Water and Environment (DAWE), which has responsibility for regulating the nation’s underwater heritage. Great care will be taken to minimise collateral damage on the wreck site. We understand this is the last resting place of her crew and will proceed with that sensitivity foremost in our minds to ensure the integrity as a grave site is not undermined. All arrangements to conserve the artefact recovered will be in place before the recovery and will be overseen by Dr Ian MacLeod, an internationally recognised expert in such matters (Dr MacLeod led the efforts to preserve AE2 and was a team member for the AE1 search and examination). The wreck is in an aggressive, tropical maritime environment, with strong seasonal currents, carrying ash from nearby volcanoes which have prevented the formation of any protective concretion. It has a finite life which will vary for individual components; the average corrosion rates are about 5 times higher than that of Australian Submarine HMAS AE2 in the Sea of Marmara. The reality is that within the next 25 - 50 years only massive iron fittings such as thrust blocks, the propellers and the propeller shafts will remain, along with the outline of the diesel engines and generators for battery charging etc, these will be shadows of their former massive natures. The artefacts being considered, such as the periscopes above the fin, bridge helm and engine room telegraph will not survive unless they are removed and conserved. As an important stakeholder I will be firstly addressing any concerns that you have and then asking for your written endorsement (or not) of this as a concept prior to any official launch. If you endorse the concept, we will launch the project and keep you informed at every step as we lock down the detailed planning and produce the wreck management plan. Fig 1 - Fin tilted forward into the wreckage of the control room showing Aft Periscope and Engine Room Telegraph, Bridge Helm mounted on the Forward Periscope. Fig 2 - Port Propeller showing stern gland, shaft and A Bracket. Images are courtesy of Paul G. Allen, Find AE1, ANMM, and Curtin University. © Navigea Ltd. These images are from the 2018 baseline survey by the RV Petrel. I include them to give you an idea of what is being proposed as options and to gauge from your reaction whether we should embark on what could be a challenging and expensive journey. I seek your support for proceeding with Project Touchstone AE1 to recover and conserve selected artefacts from AE1 before they are lost to the sea or trophy hunters and would be happy to clarify any concerns you may have. Peter Briggs AO (Mil) OAM CSC Rear Admiral RAN Retired Chairman Australian E Class Foundation. The Australian E Class Submarine Foundation (AESMF) Ltd is a not-for-profit, limited by guarantee company operated by volunteers, to protect, preserve and tell the stories of Australia’s first submarines, HMAS AE1 and AE2. This same team has successfully run projects to protect, preserve and tell the story of AE2 (Project Silent Anzac) and the successful search for AE1, (Finding The Men of AE1). Further information is available on the AESMF’s website: https://australianeclasssubmarines.com.au Editor: I can recommend the book Stoker's Submarine, as a riveting submarine story of this RAN Boat
 
Derbyshire Newsletter “The Trade Journal” go to pages 12,13,and 14
 
Link for new Newsletter (Just click on blue text)
TJ 266 Oct 2021.pdf (godfreydykes.info)
 
2nd one from Mike is the Article on Barrow in Furness and the AE1/2 Memorial where the two Boats were built. It is contained in the Port Phillip Papers released last month and widely disseminated through UK and Scotland and give the overview previously promulgated in the Grot.

AROUND THE TRAPS

 
Hold on to something and cover your arse John Merrick AKA Stuart Milburn has arisen and living the life of Riley in Goulburn of all places and an email forwarded from him which brought great joy:
 
To My Dearest and Darling Elephant Man Admirer
 
Gregory
 
Below is the confirmation I am up to date. Use this email address except for bull shit spam, births, deaths and marriages :)  I have attached a couple of old selfies for facial recognition. I am under the impression this may be an identification requirement. 
 
Six please remind young Timothy of his resemblance to Rex. Of course Rex was so much cuter in those days
 
Until we speak again
Hugs Kisses, Love Me
Milly
 
JohnM..jpg
submariner in a gash bag.jpg
Editors Note: Gee Milly you look so much better nowadays! But where's ya dress??
 
Great to hear over the last couple of weeks from Warren French and he is pretty involved with his Craft but doing well. There were some who used to take the piss out of us being on the square and then they became one (Irony to say the least).
Shorty Carty still driving his big Toot Toots and wishes his Mates well as does Digger Delaney out on a 1000 Hectare property
Noddy Shields and Bill Wasley are heading home from their WA Jaunt and the logistics for Nod to get back to QLD is a challenge.
Friend of Holebrook have much up their sleeve and any information contact Thor Lund through Carol Wilson NSW SAA Sec or the Author and Carol is conducting her annual marathon (Kids for Cancer) and we can all support this effort (Virtual one this year) and details on the SAA NSW Website.
 
Lots more and the usual funnies and video clips which are informative and bloody funny and as usual only  click in this link to view the Coxswains Store 
 
FUNNIES
 
Subject:
  
Ireland declares war on France
   

The French President is sitting in his office when his telephone rings.
"Hallo!" a heavily accented voice said. "This is Paddy Down at the Harp Pub in County Clare, Ireland. I am ringing to inform you that we are officially declaring war on you!"

"Well, Paddy," the President of France replied, "This is indeed important news! How big is your army?"
"Right now," says Paddy, after a moment's calculation, "there is meself, me Cousin Sean, me next door neighbour Seamus, and the entire darts team from the pub. That makes eight!"

The President paused. "I must tell you, Paddy, that I have 100,000 men in my army waiting to move on my command."
"Begorra!" says Paddy. "I'll have to ring you back.

Sure enough, the next day, Paddy calls again. "Mr. President, the war is still on. We have managed to get us some infantry equipment!"
"And what equipment would that be, Paddy?" The President asks.
"Well, we have two combines, a bulldozer, and Murphy's tractor."

The French President sighs amused. "I must tell you, Paddy, that I have 6,000 tanks and 5,000 armored personnel carriers. Also, I have increased my army to 150,000 since we last spoke."

"Saints preserve us!" says Paddy. "I'll have to get back to you."

Sure enough, Paddy rings again the next day. "Mr. President, the war is still on! We have managed to get ourselves airborne! We have modified Jackie McLaughlin's ultra-light with a couple of shotguns in the cockpit, and four boys from the Shamrock Pub have joined us as well!"
The French President was silent for a minute and then cleared his throat. "I must tell you, Paddy, that I have 100 bombers and 200 fighter planes. My military bases are surrounded by laser-guided, surface-to-air missile sites. And since we last spoke, I have increased my army to 200,000!"
"Jesus, Mary, and Joseph!" says Paddy, "I will have to ring you back."

Sure enough, Paddy calls again the next day. "Top o' the mornin' to ya Mr. President. I am sorry to inform you that we have had to call off the war."
"Really? I am sorry to hear that," says the French President. "Why the sudden change of heart?"
"Well," says Paddy, "we had a long chat over a few pints of Guinness and decided there is no fookin' way we can feed 200,000 French prisoners!”
Subject: Fwd: Time to Lighten Up













 


 

 
 

 
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Pretty well wraps it up for this fortnight and tried to fit as much in as possible. COVID is apparent where some are contributing more than normal and the Editor and Author love it and we have significant information in reserve to bang off so far.


Shut and Clipped for this week



Yours Aye 
 
Greg Jones #6
coxswain@submarinesaustralia.com
0432 559 283
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