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Welcome to the Coxswain's Grot - Issue 109.

11/11/2021
"We will remember them"

Fellow Submariners, today we commemorate the Armistice signed between Allies and Germany at Compiegne France, for the cessation of hostilities on the Western Front. On this day and at the 11th hour, we pause and pay tribute to fallen comrades. Given our unique Trade, the Submarine Service does go unrecognized by many but we few know of the sacrifices made and the feats performed by our Serving and Ex Serving Submariners. I hope in some small way this edition brings you joy and sadness and the opportunity to reflect of what our brothers and sisters paid the supreme sacrifice for.
 

They went with song to the battle, they were young.
Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow.
They were staunch to the end against all odds uncounted.
They fell with their faces to the foe
 
They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
WE WILL REMEMBER THEM
 
LEST WE FORGET 

The Last Post and Rouse

Saved a few of our National Historian’s till today:
CONVERTED EX-WARSHIP SUBMARINE DEPOT SHIPS compiled by Peter Smith
    The early submarines with their short radius of action were primarily regarded as coastal defence craft. Operated from suitable bases, the boats were given the duty of guarding certain lengths of coast and also taking the place of mines. In addition, these rudimentary submarines were intended to attack enemy surface ships when nearing the coast with the purpose of bombardment.
    This policy of the pre-World War One and World War One periods resulted in stationing submarines in many non-naval ports, which again required the provision of an increased number of submarine depot ships. The number of specially designed vessels of this kind was far too small to meet requirements. Therefore, old and no longer effective warships - especially cruisers - were taken in hand for limited conversions for this service. Since only small transformations were effected in these vessels, their workshop and other facilities remained rather insignificant – with the possible exception of HMS Vulcan, which already had been built as a torpedo depot ship.           
    After the end of World War 1, the remaining coastal submarines as well as their depot ships were retired from service and scrapped – again with the exception of Vulcan, which survived until 1955, although finally in a different function.
    One additional ex-warship submarine depot ship served British submarines during World War Two, the ex-monitor M.29 of World War I vintage, which under the name of Talbot (later Medway II) was employed as a mini depot ship in Malta.
Additional Ships’ Notes:   
    ANTELOPE:  A former torpedo gunboat built in 1893, with no armament, was put into service as a submarine depot at Portsmouth from 1910; 1914 was placed on the sale list, however during the war she was used for training at Devonport. The ship was sold to T.R. Sales in May 1919 to be broken up.
    Above HMS Arrogant.
ARROGANT: An ex-Protected Cruiser launched in 1896, was converted to submarine depot in 1911 with no armament. Her war service from 1914 -16 was at Dover for the 4th and 5th Submarine Flotillas, from 1915-18 was used as a base flagship. She was sold in October 1923 to Hughes Bolckow in Blyth for scrap.
    BONAVENTURE (1): An ex-Protected Cruiser launched in December 1892, was converted as a depot ship in 1907. During the First World War she was armed with 2-6in/40QF; 2-6pdr QF; in 1917, 4 -3pdr QF were added. Her war service from 1914 -16 was as a depot ship for C-class boats in the 6th Submarine Flotilla on the Humber, later on the Tyne: From 1916 -18 while still at Tyne she served the 2nd Submarine Flotilla. The ship was sold to the Forth Ship Building Co in April 1920 and arrived at Borrowstounness, Scotland in October 1920 to be broken up.         
    CRESCENT: An ex-Protected Cruiser launched in March 1892, was converted to a submarine depot in 1916, armed with 4 -6in/40 QF and for the next two years served the Grand Fleet submarines in the Rosyth area. In September 1921 was sold to G. Cohen, to be broken up in Germany.
    DOLPHIN (1): An ex-Composite Sailing Sloop of 925 tons and launched on 9 December 1882. In 1907 the ship was converted as a stationary depot for submarines at Portsmouth, (the engines had been taken out in 1899) serving as Flagship for Commodore Commanding Submarines. She was sold in 1925. Her last use was as an accommodation school ship, first with a Boy’s Club (1928-1944) and then with the Leith Nautical College (1944-1965). From 1965, after many years rotting at Leith she was eventually towed to Borrowstounness in 1977 to be broken up.
    DOLPHIN (111): Was a former tender ABERFOYLE of 210 tons which was purchased in November 1920 and renamed HMS DOLPHIN in March 1938 (there are doubts that the new name was ever painted over the original name.). She was sold for disposal in 1947.  
    FORTH (1): An ex-Protected Cruiser launched in October 1889 was converted to a submarine depot over the period of 1904-05 with armament of 4 - 6pdr QF. Her war service consisted as a depot in 1914 at Devonport; 1914 -16 in the Humber and 1916 -18 at Harwich. The ship was sold in November 1921 to Slough TC, to be broken up in Germany.
    HAZARD: ex-Torpedo Gunboat launched in February 1894 and was converted to a depot ship in 1901, with armament consisting of 2 - 4.7in/40 QF and 4 - 6pdr QF. On 2 February 1912 she collided with and sunk one of her charges - HMS A.3 off Bembridge. Her war service was depot ship at Dover from 1914 – 18; She sank off Portland Bill after a collision with the fast ambulance transport SS WESTERN AUSTRALIA which cut her in half on 28 January 1918.  
 
HMAT Western Australia as a troop transport before conversion to a hospital ship.
HEBE: An ex-Torpedo Gunboat launched in June 1892 and armed with 2 - 4.7in/40 QF; 4 - 3pdr QF, she was converted to submarine depot in 1909. Her war service was with the 6th Submarine Flotilla of C-class boats from 1914 -16 in the Humber, later in the Tyne. From 1916 - 17 with the 1st Submarine Flotilla of ‘B’ and ‘C’ class boats at Leith and then 1917-18 with the 3rd Flotilla of C-class boats in the Humber. The ship was sold in October 1919 to Ward, Preston.                
    MERCURY: An ex-Despatch Vessel launched in 1878 as a result of an early attempt to construct a fast cruiser was converted in 1906 for use as a depot. The Harbour hulk, unarmed, saw war service at Rosyth from 1914 -18. She was sold in July 1919 to Forth Ship Building Co, Borrowstounness to be broken up.  
    ONYX: An ex-Torpedo Gunboat launched in September 1892 and converted to a submarine depot ship in 1908 with no armament. Her war service was in support of the 1st Submarine Flotilla of old A-class boats at Devonport 1914 -16 and later as a base ship at Torbay 1917-18. In June 1919 she was renamed VULCAN (ii) and sold in 1924 to King, Garston and resold in October 1924 to L. Basso, Weymouth.  
    PACTOLUS: An ex-Protected Cruiser launched in December 1896 was converted to a submarine depot in 1912 with no armament. She served the 9th Flotilla of old ‘A’ and ‘B’ class boats at Ardrossan during 1914 -16 period. In October 1921 she was sold to the Multiocular Ship Building Co., Stranraer.  
        Above HMS Rosario.
ROSARIO: An ex-Steel Sloop launched in 1898 with armament of 4 -3pdr QF. The ship was a harbour hulk in Hong Kong when the three C-class submarines HMS C.36, C.37 and C.38 where sent out to the China Station in 1910, the ship readily became available for service as a submarine depot. Her war service consisted as depot ship at Hong Kong for the three C-class boats for the period of 1914 -18.  She was sold in Hong Kong in November 1921.
     ROYAL ARTHUR: The former ex-CENTAUR an ex-Protected Cruiser launched in February 1891. Her war service after being relegated to harbour duties in 1915 was as a depot ship for submarines at Rosyth until the end of the war. In August 1921 she was sold to G. Cohen to be broken up in Germany.
    ST. GEORGE: An ex-Protected Cruiser Launched in 1892 was converted in 1909 -10 as a depot ship with armament of 4 -6in/40 QF and 8 - 12pdr QF.  After employment as depot ship for destroyers she became a depot ship for submarines in the Mediterranean from 1915 until 1918. The ship was sold in July 1920 to S. Castle, Plymouth.
    SHARPSHOOTER: An ex-Torpedo Gunboat launched in November 1888 was converted in 1909 with armament of 4 - 4pdr QF and 4 -3pdr QF. From 1909 until 1912 she was attached to the Home Fleet as a submarine tender. From later in 1912 she was renamed NORTHAMPTON and used as a training ship. The ship was sold in March 1922 to be broken up on the Medway.
   Above HMS Shearwater.
SHEARWATER: A steel sloop of 980 tons was launched on 10 February 1900, with armament of 4 – 4pdr QF and 4 – 3pdr QF. For its war service in 1914 -15 the ship was stationed at Esquimalt, Canada. In 1915 she was lent to the Royal Canadian Navy to serve as a tender to the newly acquired submarines HMCS CC.1 and CC.2. The ship was put in reserve in June 1919 and sold to the Western Shipping Co. Canada in May 1922 and renamed Vedas, she was stricken from the register in 1937.
   TALBOT: An ex-Coaster Monitor launched in 1915 was the only ex-warship submarine depot ship serving British World War Two submarines. Built as the 9.2in gun-monitor HMS M.29 during World War One and converted to a coastal minesweeper and disarmed and renamed MEDUSSA in December 1925. She was named TALBOT in September 1941 and served as depot ship for the newly formed 10th Submarine Flotilla at Malta (with workshops ashore). The ship was damaged by Luftwaffe bombing in March 1942. The ship was renamed MEDWAY II in February 1944 and continued her service as a mini depot ship for the 1st Submarine Flotilla. The ship was sold in September 1946.
    THAMES: An ex-Protected Cruiser was launched in December 1885 and converted over the period of 1902-03 with armament of 4 -6pdr QF. It saw war service from 1914 as a depot ship for the 5th Submarine Flotilla of C-class boats at Harwich. Later in 1914 she served as a submarine depot at Sheerness and then later in the same capacity at Portsmouth and Campbelltown. The ship was sold in November 1920 and renamed GENERAL BOTHA and used as a training ship at The Cape, South Africa. The name was reverted back to THAMES in 1942 and used as an accommodation ship. She was scuttled on 13 May 1947 in Simons Bay.        
    VENUS: An ex-Protected Cruiser launched in 1895 with armament of 11-6in/45 BL; 8-12pdr QF and 1-3pdr QF. The ship saw service in 1912 until 1914 in the Home Fleet and served temporarily as a depot ship for submarines. She was sold for scrap in September 1921 to G. Cohen and broken up in Germany.
    VULCAN: An ex-Torpedo Depot Ship launched in March 1889 and converted to a submarine depot ship over 1907-08, was armed in 1915 with 8-6pdr QF and 4 -3pdr QF. The ship was commissioned on 5 January 1909 as a submarine depot, serving in this capacity in Home waters until 1930. Her war service was as depot to the 7th Submarine Flotilla at Leith (C-class boats) from 1914 -16, and then the rest of the war serving submarines on the Humber, at Berehaven and Blyth. On 17 February 1931 she was renamed DEFIANCE III and used as a torpedo school ship. The ship had a particularly long life afloat and was taken out of service after 66 years and in December 1955 she arrived in Belgium to be broken up.    
CONVERTED EX-MERCANTILE SUBMARINE DEPOT SHIPS
    The urgent need for additional Submarine Depot Ships during both World Wars and before was partly satisfied by converting a number of mercantile hulls. This means had already been resorted to for the provision of the first Royal Navy depot ship: this was HECLA of the late 1870s (she served as parent ship for torpedo boats), which had originally been laid down as the mercantile BRITISH CROWN.
    For the purpose of repair and maintenance of submarines rather less well equipped than most purpose-built depot ships, the converted ex-mercantile vessels became popular at least as accommodation ships for the Senior Officer and his staff as well as for the displacement, which in addition allowed for ample storage space for torpedoes, ammunition and supplies.    
ADDITION SHIP’S NOTES
World War One Period Depot Ships
    AMBROSE: Originally hired and commissioned on 10 December 1914 as an armed merchant cruiser of 6,600 tons, was purchased in 1915 for conversion into a submarine depot, armed with 2 – 12pdr/40 QF. The ship served as a depot from 1917/18 at Berehaven and 1918 serving submarines at Falmouth. The ship survived into the World War Two period, in 1938 she was renamed COCHRANE and used as a base ship, her second war service was as harbour depot for submarines. The ship was sold in August 1946 for scrap and was taken to Ward, Inverkeithing in November 1946 to be broken up.
    AQUARIUS: Built in 1900 as mercantile HAMPSTEAD of 3,660 tons, was acquired in 1902 for the Fleet Train (Royal Fleet Auxiliary) for service as store and distilling ship. In 1906 the ship was transferred to the Royal Navy and renamed AQUARIUS and equipped as a repair and distilling ship with no armament. She served in the Mediterranean with submarines from 1915. The ship was sold in 1920.
    CYCLOPS: Originally the former mercantile INDRANARAH of 11,300 tons was purchased on the stocks in 1905. She served with the Grand Fleet as a floating workshop and distilling ship during the First World War. It was not until after the war that the she was fitted for service as a submarine depot ship, commissioning on 21 December 1922 as a depot for Atlantic Fleet submarines. Later she saw service in the Mediterranean until transferred to Dockyard Control at Malta on 24 June 1938. The ship was taken back under the control of the Royal Navy at the onset of World War Two and armed with 2 – 4in/40 QF. She continued in service as a submarine depot ship during 1939 in the Mediterranean until transferring for the remainder of the war employed in Home waters. In 1947 the ship was taken out of service and she arrived at Cashmore, Newport in July 1947 to be broken up.










 
 
Above HMS Lucia

           
    










LUCIA: Was the former German Hamburg – Amerika liner SPREEWALD of 5,805 tons, built by Furness Withy, West Hartlepool in 1907. The ship was captured and taken as a prize by the First Class cruiser HMS BERWICK off St. Lucia in the West Indies on 12 September 1914. The ship was fitted out by Clyde S.B. Co. as a submarine depot in 1916 with armament of 2 – 3pdr HA. Her war service consisted as depot for the 10th Submarine Flotilla of ‘E’ and ‘G’ class boats at Tees. She survived to see service in World War Two, with no armament, in 1939 as a submarine depot in the East Indies and from 1942 to 1945 with the Eastern Fleet. On 4 September 1946 the ship was sold and renamed SINAI.
    PANDORA: Was the Russian mercantile SETI of 4,580 tons, which was purchased in 1914 and converted, without armament, into a depot ship for submarines at Harwich from 1915 to 1918. Renamed DOLPHIN (11) in 1924 and used as a depot ship at Fort Blockhouse replacing DOLPHIN (1), she survived until World War Two; however, she was mined on 23 November 1939 off Blyth while on passage for conversion into a block-ship.
    TITANIA: A ship of 5,270 tons was purchased on stocks in 1915 and completed as a submarine depot ship with no armament. From 1915 to 1918 she served the submarines at Blyth. The ship survived to see service in World War Two from 1939 to 1945 in Home Waters at first at Rothesay and then from 1942 in Loch Cairnbawn, serving as a depot ship for Chariot Human Torpedoes and Welman one-man submarines. After the war the ship was taken out of service and she arrived in September 1949 at Faslane to be broken up.
    HMAS UPOLU: A steamer of 1,141 tons, built in 1891, was hired to work as a depot for the RAN submarines HMAS AE.1 and AE2 in August 1914. On 9 December 1914 the ship was paid off and returned after AE.1 was lost off the Duke of York Island and the transfer of AE.2 to the Mediterranean.   
World War Two Period Depot Ships
    BONAVENTURE (11) Formerly the mercantile ex-CLAN DAVIDSON of 9,166 tons was a Clan Line cargo vessel under construction when requisitioned on 27 October 1942 for conversion by Scotts into a depot ship for X-craft. She was armed with 2 – 4in/45 HA; 12 – 20 mm HA. Her war service from 1942-44 was as a depot ship in Loch Cairnbawn and in February 1945 left Clyde for the far east with six XE-craft of the 14th Flotilla carried on deck. The ship was sold in 1948 and eventually broken up in Hong Kong in 1962.  
    MONTCLARE: A passenger liner of 16,314 tons was hired from the Canadian Pacific Steamships in 1939 and used as an armed merchant cruiser. On 2 June 1942 the ship was purchased outright and converted to a depot ship for submarines. Her armament consisted of 4 - 4in/45 HA; 32 – 2pdr HA and 19-20mm HA. The ship saw service with the Pacific Fleet as Fleet Train headquarters ship 1944 - 45. The ship was disposed of in 1957; she arrived at Ward, Inverkeithing on 3 February 1958 to be broken up. 
        WOLFE: Formally the requisitioned Canadian Pacific Steamships’ MONTCALM of 16,420 gross tons was hired as an armed merchant cruiser and commissioned as WOLFE on 21 November 1939. In May 1942 the ship was purchased outright and converted into a submarine depot ship, with armament of 4 - 4in/45 HA; 32 – 2pdr HA and 19 - 20mm HA. She was used as a depot with the 3rd Submarine Flotilla in the Clyde, 1942 - 44; from August 1944 with the East Indies Fleet at Trincomalee, serving the 2nd Submarine Flotilla of six S-class boats, plus Porpoise, Severn and Clyde. The ship arrived at Faslane on 8 November 1952 to be broken up.
    HMAS WHANG PU: A shallow river steamer built in Hong Kong in 1920, the ship of 3,204 tons was originally requisitioned in December 1941 by the Royal Navy and was being converted to a submarine depot in Singapore when advancing Japanese forces forced the ship to sail to Australia. The ship was commissioned into the RAN on 1 October 1943. She left Melbourne in early 1944 after conversion to a repair ship and was employed in New Guinea waters. Later she was used as a stores ship at Morotai. The ship was paid off and returned to the owners on 22 April 1946.  
    WUCHANG: A Hong Kong shallow draught steamer of 3,214 gross tons, like WHANG PU was requisitioned in 1941 and was being converted for submarine service in Singapore when it was forced to sail to Colombo. The ship was officially commissioned into the Royal Navy on 12 May 1942 and was used as a submarine depot and accommodation ship for submarine crews. With the arrival of LUCIA to Colombo from the Mediterranean, Commander R.M.G. Gambier RN acting Captain S/m moved his command to the ship and WUCHANG was used for the overflow. During 1943 the ship was sent to Trincomalee for a period but was recalled in June to return to Colombo when there was a build-up of submarines stationed there. Again in November of 1943 the ship returned to Trincomalee and was used as a depot and accommodation ship until 1945. In April 1946 the ship was handed back to its owners.
    The majority of the above information is from the “Encyclopaedia of British Submarines 1901-1955” by Paul Akermann with additional information from “Ships of the Royal Navy” Volume 1 and 2 by J.J. Colledge, “Lloyd’s Register of Shipping 1937-38” and from “Australian & New Zealand Warships 1914 -1945” by Ross Gillett. (Smudge).
    While researching the above story to put flesh on the bare bones of information contained in the addition ships’ notes in the Encyclopaedia of British Submarines, I came across one other submarine depot ship that our war time readers may have been involved with in the war in the Indian Ocean and that was the Dutch ship COLOMBIA. 
    In late December 1941 the Commander-in-Chief of the Eastern Fleet was informed that the Netherlands’ naval authorities in London had agreed to send out their submarine depot ship and three of their O-class submarines to augment the allied submarine capacity in the Far East. COLOMBIA the flagship of Koninklijke Nederlansche Stoomboot Maatchappij (Royal Dutch Line), of 11,000 tons, was completed in 1930 at Rotterdam as a passenger liner. After being fitted out in the United Kingdom for her new role, she arrived at Colombo on 4 March 1942 from Dundee via the Cape of Good Hope.  On board was Commander Gambier RN who was Commander S/m in an advisory capacity.  
    In May 1942 it was found that most of the Dutch submarines were in need of docking and repairs so COLOMBIA was sent with them to Bombay (Mumbai) to provide accommodation and assist with their refits.
    In August 1942, COLOMBIA was sent to South Africa and based at East London to act as a depot and staging point for the Dutch submarines on their way out from the United Kingdom to join the Eastern Fleet, and for those which were going to the United States for major refit.   
    In February 1943 the ship was recalled to Colombo having completed her role of assistance. By this time, she was in need of docking and it was arranged that she go to Simonstown for this purpose before sailing to Ceylon. As escorts were in short supply it was decided to sail her by day only, so that a continuous air escort could be provided for her. Only one escort of a corvette, HMS Genista could be provided for passage from East London to Port Elizabeth. When a sighting report of a U-boat was received from a training aircraft, a South African minesweeper trawler and an extra aircraft were sent out to search. This aircraft was over the top of COLOMBIA when the ship was hit by a torpedo from U-516 commanded by Korvettenkapitan zur See Gerhard Wiebe about 1130 on 27 February 1943. COLOMBIA sank in thirteen minutes with the loss of eight of her ship’s company. Genista’s cursory counterattack did no damage to U-516.          
    Wiebe identified and reported his target as COLOMBIA; however, the importance of his target was not appreciated by the German U-boat command. (Smudge).
    In an aside to the Canadian Pacific Steamships’ MONTCALM and MONTCLARE, both ships of the Mont-class were built by J Brown Co. Ltd in Glasgow, the first was competed in 1921 and the latter in 1922, both ships had twin screws each and were built with cruiser sterns. It is interesting to note that although the ships were Canadian owned they were registered in Liverpool, England.  
   In reference to LUCIA, the original ship’s bell with the name SPREEWALD was used throughout her Royal Navy service.
   On 5 April 1942 LUCIA was one of a group of 30 ships that had not evacuated Colombo prior to the Japanese fleet air arm attack on the port. The ship sustained a single bomb hit which did not explode, however it passed straight through forward, exiting through the hull. Her Engineer Officer stated that the bomb’s path was traced with the unerring accuracy usually associated with expert surgery, right through the line he would have selected to cause minimum damage.  However, when the air raid had started HMS/m Trusty was alongside and was about to load torpedoes prior to going out on patrol, some of Trusty’s crew were on the ship at the time and were trapped by a watertight door that had become jammed; they had to squeeze out through a scuttle and swim to the submarine.        
   In an aside to HMS Shearwater, she was one of two British war ships based on the Canada Station at Esquimalt on the southern tip of Vancouver Island, British Columbia. The two C-class submarines were built to specification and drawings supplied by the Electric Boat Company of New Jersey at the Seattle Construction and Drydock Company. Built originally for the Chilean Navy and named IQUIQUE and ANTOFAGASTA they were acquired on 7 August 1914 when the Chilean Government reneged on the deal. It was after the acquisition of the Canada’s first submarines that SHEARWATER was commissioned into the Canadian Navy and used as a submarine depot ship. There was a lot of urgency to get the deal and flotilla set up as World War One had just begun and the Allies were chasing the German Asiatic Fleet in the Pacific. (Smudge)       
    In reference to WHANG PU and WUCHANG both ships were built by the Taikoo Dockyard and Engineering Co. of Hong Kong Ltd., Hong Kong and were owned by the China Navigation Co. Ltd. The ships with twin screws each were an ugly, but functional two deck ferry/cargo mercantile that plied the rivers and coast of China. It is interesting to note that the ship’s port of register was London and that they flew the British flags.
    While describing the civilian ships that were either requisitioned or purchased, I have continued with the rules of Lloyd’s Register which state, that the date of built is the date the ship is launched.
HMS Hazard sank off Portland Bill after a collision with the fast ambulance transport HMAHS Western Australia which cut her in half on 28 January 1918.   
 
The Trade and its origins of the word in submarines by Peter Smith.
   Firstly, Rudyard Kipling’s poem. Kipling was a journalist, and as a ‘war correspondent’ was invited to go to sea in HM Submarine E5 in September 1915, it was after this trip that he penned his poem on the images and stories that were recounted while on-board, which was then published in early 1916. The first words he wrote in a booklet of the experience were: ‘’I was honoured by a glimpse into this veiled life in a boat which was merely practising (exercising) between trips. Submarines are like cats. They never tell ‘who they were with last night’ and they sleep as much as they can.”
   Secondly, the name “The Trade” was given to the submarine branch before Kipling made it popular in his verse. The following extract from Richard Compton-Hall’s book “Submarines and the War at Sea 1914-18” aptly describes how the nickname was created. “We must deal with usage and development of what he called the tools of the trade. The Royal Navy’s Submarine Service was popularly known as The Trade at a time when trading was anathema to the ruling classes – no occupation for a gentleman. It was a name, coined when submarines were still in their infancy that reflected a curious mixture of admiration, envy and lofty scorn for officers and men who necessarily acquired mechanical skills known only to specialists in the surface fleet.”
    There are many early photographs of submarine officers standing with their crews all dirty and scruffy looking; it was no wonder that they were likened to at the time as ‘unwashed chauffeurs’ or tradesmen.        
     
THE TRADE By Rudyard Kipling 1914 – 18 (Sea Warfare)
“They bear, in place of classic names,
Letters and numbers on their skin.
They play their grisly blindfold games
In little box made of tin.
Sometimes they stalk the Zeppelin,
Sometimes they learn where mines are laid,
Or where the Baltic ice is thin.
That is the custom of “The Trade.”
 
“Few prize-courts sit upon their claims.
They seldom tow their targets in.
They follow certain secret aims
Down under, far from strife or din.
When they are ready to begin
No flag is flown, no fuss is made
More than the shearing of a pin.
That is the custom of “The Trade.”
 
“The Scout’s quadruple funnel flames
A mark from Sweden to the Swim,
The Cruiser’s thund’rous screw proclaims
Her comings out and goings in:
But only whiffs of paraffin
Or creamy rings that fizz and fade
Show where the one-eyed Death has been.
That is the custom of “The Trade.”
 
“Their feats, their fortunes and their fames
Are hidden from their nearest kin;
No eager public backs or blames,
No journal prints the yarn they spin
(The Censor would not let it in!)
When they return from run or raid.
Unheard they work, unseen they win.
That is the Custom of “The Trade.””    
 
 
A picture containing text, outdoor, boat, oldDescription automatically generated
      
A group of people on a boatDescription automatically generated
Crew of a “B” class submarine.
 
IN DEPTH By Smudge Smith.
I was asked by the “Grott Team” to do or find something substantial for this edition to celebrate Remembrance Day. I found that this was quite an ask. As we seemed to not have anything of greatness that we as Australian submarines could celebrate, other than the loss of both HMS/m AE1 and AE2. However, I put my mind together and decided that I let Rudyard Kipling have a go and came up with his words of wisdom about submarines and servicemen during the First World War. Note some of Rudyard’s work was written during the First World War and I cannot find a poem or works that he may have written at the end, maybe he was still distraught from his son John’s death on the front line to write about the outcome of the war.   
IF- By Rudyard Kipling (1943) with a slight change to the last line.
“If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too;
If You can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
Or being hated, don’t give way to hating
And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:
      
       “If you can dream – and not make dreams your master;
If you can think – and not make thought your aim;
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same;
If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
And stoop and build ‘em up with worn-out tools;
 
“If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
And never breath a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
       And so, hold on when there is nothing in you
       Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’
       
              “If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
      Or walk with Kings-nor lose the common touch,
             If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
             If all men count with you, but none too much;
             If you can fill the unforgiving minute
             With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
            Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it
            And-which is more- you’ll be a Submariner, my son!”
 
The Fringes of the Fleet by Rudyard Kipling (1916)
“Be well assured that on our side
Our challenged the oceans flight,
Through headlong wind and leaping tide
Make us their sport to-night
Through force of weather, not of war,
In jeopardy we steer.
Then welcome Fate’s discourtesy
Whereby it shall appear
How in time of our distress
As in our triumph too,
The game is more than the player of the game
And the ship is more than the crew!
 
“Be well assured, through wave and wind
Have mightier blows in store
That we who keep the watch assigned
Must stand to it the more;
And as our streaming bows dismiss
Each billow’s baulked career,
Sing welcome Fate’s discourtesy
Whereby it is made clear
How in all time of our distress
As in our triumph too,
The game is more than the player of the game,
And the ship is more than the crew!
 
“Be well assured, though in our power
Is nothing left to give
But time and place to strive and live,
Till these dissolve our order holds,
Our Service binds us here.
Then welcome Fate’s discourtesy
Whereby it is made clear
How in all time of our distress
And our deliverance too,
The game is more than the player of the game,
And the ship is more than the crew!”
 
Kipling on submarines, then known as boats.
The Man and his Work.
“Now there is a mystery of the Service.
A man gets a boat which for two years becomes his very self---
His morning hope, his evening dream,
His joy throughout the day.”
 
“The ships destroy us above
And ensnare us beneath.
We arise, we lie down, and we move
In the belly of Death.
The ships have a thousand eyes
To mark where we come. . .
And the mirth of a seaport dies
When our blow gets home.”
A picture containing boat, outdoor, sky, waterDescription automatically generated
 
Royal Navy submarines during WW1
 
One from Jeff Stein:
 
Yup - the attachment certainly says it all!!!
A sign on the little school in the French village of Villers- Bretonneux, a school rebuilt by the donations of Victorian school children
after WW1.   The school is appropriately named Victoria.

On 25 April, 1918, Australian troops recaptured the village from the German Army.
Australia’s National War Memorial in France is located a couple of km’s outside the village.

 
Very appropriate for today, the article on our SAA Patron LCDR Michael Hickie DSC, Dagger, and our only surviving WWII Submariner.
 
Please follow link below to read article run by Sunday Sun-Herald 07-11-2021. It is a great story. Beware the ads!!

https://www.smh.com.au/national/arctic-dives-sinking-ships-and-enemy-collisions-the-last-surviving-wwii-sub-commander-20211105-p596au.html
 
ETERNAL PATROL
 
Once again, my sad duty to inform those not on Social Media of the sad passing of PO Bob O’Brien and LS Greg Raymond. Details for Bob (Otama Plank Owner) are not known and Greg’s Funeral will be held in Melbourne today. Our heart felt condolences to Family and Friends, and Bishop Dalby has requested the following:
 
Picture
THE SUBMARINER’S PRAYER

O Father, Hear our prayer to thee
For your humble servants
Beneath the sea

In the depths of oceans, as oft they stray
So far from night, so far from day
We would ask your guiding light to glow
To make their journey safe below

Please oft times grant them patient mind
Then ‘ere the darkness won’t them blind
They seek thy protection from the deep
Please grant them peace when ‘ere they sleep

Of their homes and loved ones far away
We ask you care for them each day
Until they surface once again
To drink the air and feel the rain

We ask your guiding hand to show
A safe progression sure and slow.
Dear Lord, please hear our prayer to thee,
For your humble servants
Beneath the sea.


Amen
 
Fair winds and smooth seas on your Last Patrol. May your final port of call be peaceful and you are fondly remembered by many. God Bless.
 
From QLD Branch
 
Dear Members,
 
We will be observing Remembrance Day at the Submariners Walk Memorial, Macquarie St, Teneriffe. We will muster at 1045 and observe a minute's silence at 1100. 
 
All are most welcome. The more the merrier. It is hoped to have a get together afterward at a local establishment. Families of those members who have crossed the bar have been invited. Some will be attending. 
 
We look forward to seeing you there.
 
Kind regards...
Ross Walters
Secretary SAA QLD Inc
 
NB: I have requested that Ross forward any feedback from the Service and would ask the same of all State Secretaries for the next Grot.
 
That pretty well wraps up the Remembrance Day feature, and now back to our basic format.

 
ALL ROUND LOOK


Hello All Round Look subscribers

These articles have been selected as potentially being of interest to subscribers of the Submarine Institute of Australia newsletter 'All Round Look' and, apart from any releases authored by the SIA, no new content is created in this newsletter. Inclusion of an article in this newsletter does not reflect endorsement or agreement of the content by the SIA.

Through its contract with Meltwater, the SIA is licensed and has paid for the copyright access to distribute the articles.  There may still be articles where the access to the content is restricted by the publisher through a paywall.
 
Submarine Institute of Australia
   
 
Less than 24 hours until SubSTEC6 - check out the Conference Handbook
Submarine Institute of Australia - 8 November 2021
 
As this newsletter arrives in your inbox, the Industry Tours for SubSTEC6 are leaving North Terrace. The conference is set to be a cracker with over 200 delegates in person and over 100 participating online. Online registrations are open until 18.00 ACDT) tonight. Click the link to download the Handbook.
 
 
ADM – Official Media Partner of SubSTEC6
Submarine Institute of Australia - 4 November 2021
 
The Submarine Institute of Australia (SIA) would like to acknowledge that the official Media Partner of the 6th Submarine Science, Technology and Engineering Conference (SubSTEC6) is Australian Defence Magazine (ADM). ADM (www.australiandefence.com.au) is dedicated to reporting the business of defe
 
 
SIA Media Release - Final call to register for conference
Submarine Institute of Australia - 1 November 2021
 
 
 
 
Submarine News
   
 
Hot new courses
Campus Morning Mail - 8 November 2021
Got a nuclear engineering syllabus encased in concrete? The government wants you to get it out “We need to really start growing our human ...
is a critical part of getting our country ready for nuclear submarines. We are not just talking about nuclear submarines. There is a lot of
 
 
After a week, a semblance of sense on submarines
The Spectator Australia - 7 November 2021
It’s only taken a week to get here, but at last we’re seeing some semblance of sense over Australia’s future submarines. Today, Alexander ...
but at last we’re seeing some semblance of sense over Australia’s future submarines. Today, Alexander Downer has said what any backbencher
 
 
US and UK ‘reluctant’ to lease submarines to Australia until ‘sufficiently skilled’
News.com.au (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 7 November 2021
The US and UK would be reluctant to lease Australia a nuclear submarine until it has sufficiently skilled ...
US and UK governments on the possibility of leasing their submarines before the first nuclear submarine is built for Australia by 2040,” Mr
 
 
What happened to a regionally superior conventional submarine?
Asia Pacific Defence Reporter - 7 November 2021
That was quick. Just a few days ago Australia was in the process of spending $50 billion – in 2016 dollars – on the most advanced ...
in the region. Ministers underlined the importance of the Future Submarine program. They agreed to strengthen military scientific research
 
 
Australia’s last World War Two submarine commander
WAtoday.com.au (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 7 November 2021
Michael Hickie is one of the last surviving submarine commanders who served in World War II. The Narrabeen ...
Michael Hickie is one of the last surviving submarine commanders who served in World War II. The Narrabeen resident has dived under ice
 
 
ABC’s attack on Morrison over submarines is torpedoed by facts
The Daily Telegraph (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 6 November 2021
Prime Minister Scott Morrison was fully entitled to ensure that the facts were laid out when he was grossly ...
Naval) which required the complete redesigning of a nuclear submarine, scrapping its nuclear power in favour of already obsolescent diesel
 
 
AUKUS: Rev-up for submarine decision process
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 5 November 2021
The Morrison government plans to shorten the 18-month consideration period for the taskforce led by Admiral Jonathan Meade to determine Australias needs and requirements for a nuclear-powered submarine under the AUKUS alliance.
The Morrison government plans to shorten the 18-month consideration period for the taskforce led by Admiral Jonathan Meade to determine Australias needs and requirements for a nuclear-powered submarine under the AUKUS alliance.
 
 
US navy fires senior officers of nuclear-powered attack submarine damaged in underwater collision in South China Sea
ABC News - 5 November 2021
The USS Connecticut (SSN 22, pictured in 2016) is a Seawolf-class fast-attack submarine.(AP: Thiep Van Nguyen II/US Navy/File photo) The US ...
from geological features to whales. The Navy has said the submarine's nuclear reactor and propulsion system were not damaged. The collision
 
 
Australia already has a submarine capability gap
The Strategist - 5 November 2021
At Senate estimates hearings on 24 March of this year, the independent Senator Malcolm Roberts bluntly asked Defence Department officials ...
a submarine capability gap during the (now even longer) transition to its future submarines? Since we started by talking about submarines,
 
 
Australia’s ‘week from hell’ on world stage
Ntnews.com.au (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 5 November 2021
The PM headed overseas to build bridges and show leadership. But with spats, gaffes and anger a plenty he may be ...
. That saw it scrap a $90 billion 2016 deal for French submarines for a new nuclear powered fleet from the UK or US. Events began to go
 
 
Awkward lessons of AUKUS and France
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 5 November 2021
Its not yet two months old, but AUKUS is already showering us with lessons about statecraft, strategy, politics and how to buy submarines. Here is my take on what the past seven weeks have shown us.
Its not yet two months old, but AUKUS is already showering us with lessons about statecraft, strategy, politics and how to buy submarines. Here is my take on what the past seven weeks have shown us.
 
 
Few realistic options for Defence to fill its submarine 'capability gap' before new nuclear fleet
PressFrom - Germany - 4 November 2021
In a blistering National Press Club address on Wednesday, France's ambassador warned that Australia may have created a submarine capability ...
a looming headache on how to replace its ageing Collins Class submarine fleet. Acquiring nuclear submarines will take decades, and over the
 
 
The great Australian defence strategy delusion
On Line Opinion - 4 November 2021
Australia has been under siege from China, feeling alone and isolated over the last eighteen months. China has lambasted Australia through ...
a base and staging ground for a nuclear submarine fleet, Australia will just be more vulnerable to a nuclear attack from China in the event
 
 
Sonardyne, Wavefront Demonstrate Obstacle Avoidance XLUUV
Ocean News & Technology Magazine - 4 November 2021
Underwater obstacle avoidance technology from maritime defence technology companies, Sonardyne and Wavefront, has been successfully ...
, to help the Royal Navy understand the future roles for XLUUVS for surveillance, reconnaissance and anti-submarine warfare, and deliver new
 
 
Rethinking Australia’s ‘magical obsession’ with submarines
Defence Connect - 4 November 2021
Has Australia’s fixation on procuring next-generation submarines done more harm than good?
submarines, which will replace the ageing Collins Class fleet. VADM Mead confirmed he expected at least one nuclear-powered submarine to be
 
 
Update on the UK’s nuclear submarine disposal efforts
UK Defence Journal - Impartial and Current - 4 November 2021
The UK’s Submarine Dismantling Project hopes to dismantle 27 of the UK’s de-fuelled, nuclear powered submarines after they have left ...
in the United Kingdom’s future nuclear deterrent: the 2020 update to Parliament, we continue to develop the submarine dismantling techniques
 
 
First Submarine To Use New Stealth Technology
Naval News - 3 November 2021
The Royal Navy’s new Dreadnought Class submarine promises to be the stealthiest yet. The first two boats, HMS Dreadnought and HMS Valiant, ...
true today and tomorrow. Speed, depth and countermeasures can all help a submarine escape, but not being seen in the first place is the best
 
 
Sacre bleu! Defence’s new blow to France over Sydney dockyard
InnovationAus.com - 3 November 2021
The Department of Defence is canvassing views on the future management of the Captain Cook graving dock at the Garden Island Defence ...
-owned Naval Group to build submarines in Adelaide, the announcement of a Request for Information on the dock’s future would seem to be
 
 
US has capacity to supply Aussie nuclear subs, says congressman Joe Courtney
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 3 November 2021
The chairman of the US congresss seapower committee has dismissed as very unfair concerns American shipyards are too busy to supply nuclear-powered submarines to Australia, arguing extra orders could help lift industrial capacity back towards Cold War ...
The chairman of the US congresss seapower committee has dismissed as very unfair concerns American shipyards are too busy to supply nuclear-powered submarines to Australia, arguing extra orders could help lift industrial capacity back towards Cold War ...
 
 
Business sunk $35m into failed submarine deal
@AuManufacturing - 3 November 2021
South Australian businesses spent at least $35 million in preparation for the now-abandoned construction of Attack-class submarines.
Prime Minister Scott Morrison of lying about the decision to sign a nuclear submarine deal with Britain and the US. Clark, a former interim
 
 
It’s time to talk about existential risk
Lowy Institute for International Policy - 3 November 2021
There will be no chance to review the “lessons learned”.
acquire nuclear powered submarines. This would exploit a loophole in the International Atomic Energy Agency system whereby nuclear
 
 
French envoy to discuss torpedoed sub deal
Seymour Telegraph - 3 November 2021
France's envoy is set to outline how his nation plans to redefine its relationship with Australia in the wake of a $90 billion submarine ...
with France would be to allow the country to re-tender for the submarines, based on a nuclear-powered model.As well, the UK and US should be
 
 
Aussies To Pick ‘Mature’ Nuke Sub Design; Is UK’s Astute Class Frontrunner?
Breaking Defense - 2 November 2021
Analyst Tim Walton thinks it'd be wise for Australia to field other, complementary undersea warfare capabilities such as "the ...
required to improve and extend the life of the Collins class submarines. Those modified Collins subs will require extended hulls, so that
 
 
Here's how a $3 billion US attack submarine can run into an underwater mountain, according to a former submariner
Business Insider Australia - 2 November 2021
The Seawolf-class fast-attack submarine USS Connecticut (SSN 22) at Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton. US Navy A US Navy submarine collided with ...
likely be closer to the bottom and not relying on active sonar, which can alert the submarine to any potential dangers, such as naval mines,
 
 
REVEALED: Nuclear-powered attack submarine USS Connecticut struck 'uncharted sea mount' in South China Sea, injuring 11 of its crew last month, US Navy investigation finds
Daily Mail - 2 November 2021
On the day of the accident there had been soaring tensions with China But the Navy has determined that there was no foul play in the ...
A US nuclear submarine struck an 'uncharted sea mount' in the South China Sea, injuring 11 of its crew last month, a Navy investigation has
 
 
Looking back at the controversy over the French submarine contract
ABC News - 2 November 2021
The Prime Minister Scott Morrison arrived in Glasgow overnight for the UN climate talks. So far, for Australia at least, climate change has ...
proposed French submarines were based on an existing nuclear one and that the possibility of the French submarines eventually being nuclear
 
 
Australian government should ‘push’ to use retiring nuclear-powered submarines for training
Sky News Australia - 2 November 2021
ASPI’s Peter Jennings says Australia should “push very hard” to use retiring nuclear-powered submarines for training. “This is going to ...
Jennings says Australia should “push very hard” to use retiring nuclear-powered submarines for training. “This is going to require actually
 
 
The Perisher: Inside the grueling test the Royal Navy uses to pick its submarine commanders
Business Insider Australia - 1 November 2021
HMS Astute returns to Her Majesty’s Naval Base Clyde in Scotland, March 1, 2012. Royal Navy/LA(Phot) Paul Halliwell British Royal Navy ...
weeks of the course are spent at sea aboard a nuclear-powered attack submarine in coordination with the UK’s biannual Joint Warrior exercise
 
Manufacturing news briefs – stories you might have missed
@AuManufacturing - 1 November 2021
RM Williams expands Australian manufacturing
Indo-Pacific forum on submarines, the event is hosted by the Submarine Institute of Australia and features speakers on the theme ‘Home grown
 
 
Australia and Nuclear-Powered Submarines
U.S. Naval Institute - 1 November 2021
In September, the Australian government announced it would buy nuclear-powered rather than conventionally powered submarines to replace its ...
buy nuclear-powered rather than conventionally powered submarines to replace its six Collins-class diesel-electric boats. The announcement
 
 
Netherlands’ Walrus-Class Submarine Replacement Program Facing Delays
Naval News - 31 October 2021
The Dutch "Walrus-class replacement program" will take more time than initially planned. The delay in the procurement of four new ...
Netherlands’ Walrus-Class Submarine Replacement Program Facing Delays
 
 
‘Very upsetting’: Australian families fear navy shipwrecks will be desecrated
Australia News - The Guardian - 31 October 2021
There are concerns rising metal prices will lead to more illegal scavenging unless the government acts to protect wrecks
convenor of the AE1 descendant families’ association, which comprises about 100 people related to the 35 men who died when the AE1 went down
 
 
British nuclear submarine HMS Astute docks in Perth | The Australian
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 30 October 2021
British nuclear submarine HMS Astute has docked in Western Australia just hours after French President Emmanuel Macron accused Prime Minister Scott Morrison of "breaking their relationship of trust". It's the first attack vessel from the United Kingdom ...
British nuclear submarine HMS Astute has docked in Western Australia just hours after French President Emmanuel Macron accused Prime Minister Scott Morrison of "breaking their relationship of trust". It's the first attack vessel from the United Kingdom .
 
 
‘Australia’s sharpest minds’ needed to pull off nuclear submarine plan
The Strategist - 30 October 2021
A multi-disciplinary taskforce is recruiting ‘Australia’s sharpest minds’ to tackle the herculean task of providing the Royal Australian ...
the RAN with nuclear-powered submarines would be both challenging and important. ‘Australia does not have a nuclear domestic infrastructure.
 
 
Britain pushes Australia to buy its nuclear submarines instead of US rivals
DNYUZ - 30 October 2021
A Royal Navy submarine has visited Australia as Britain pitches to gazump the US and build Canberra a new underwater fleet to counter China ...
HMS Astute may also take part in exercises with an Australian Collins-class submarine. Peter Jennings, from the Australian Strategic Policy
 
 
Vice Admiral Jonathan Mead: nuclear submarines are a game changer for Australia | The Australian
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 30 October 2021
As chief of the Nuclear-Powered Submarine Task Force my role is to advise government on the optimal pathway to acquiring a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines for Australia. Nuclear-powered submarines will fundamentally change Australia’s strategic ...
As chief of the Nuclear-Powered Submarine Task Force my role is to advise government on the optimal pathway to acquiring a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines for Australia. Nuclear-powered submarines will fundamentally change Australia’s strategic ...
 
 
Interchangeable forces key to submarine success | The Australian
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 30 October 2021
The Morrison government’s groundbreaking AUKUS agreement has the potential to accelerate the transformation of the Northern Territory from strategic backwater to vital alliance hub.
The Morrison government’s groundbreaking AUKUS agreement has the potential to accelerate the transformation of the Northern Territory from strategic backwater to vital alliance hub.
 
 
Six ageing subs are all we’ll have for the next 20 years | The Australian
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 30 October 2021
Now that the excitement has faded from the announcement on September 16 that Australia will acquire nuclear powered submarines it is becoming clearer that doing so will take decades of effort. The idea that we can simply lease some British or American ...
Now that the excitement has faded from the announcement on September 16 that Australia will acquire nuclear powered submarines it is becoming clearer that doing so will take decades of effort. The idea that we can simply lease some British or American ...
 
 
Joint Media Release - UK nuclear-powered submarine to visit Perth (AUS)
Australian Associated Press - PRNewswire - 29 October 2021
AUSTRALIAN ASSOCIATED PRESS
MEDIA RELEASE UK NUCLEAR-POWERED SUBMARINE TO VISIT PERTH (AUS) 29 October 2021 A Royal Navy nuclear-powered submarine will conduct a
 
 
British sub’s visit an Astute showcase of AUKUS alliance
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 29 October 2021
A British nuclear-powered submarine has arrived in Perth as the UK moves to showcase the Astutes capabilities to the Royal Australian Navy.
A British nuclear-powered submarine has arrived in Perth as the UK moves to showcase the Astutes capabilities to the Royal Australian Navy.
 
 
British nuclear submarine visits Australia
UK Defence Journal - Impartial and Current - 29 October 2021
HMS Astute, a nuclear submarine deployed with HMS Queen Elizabeth’s Carrier Strike Group, has arrived in Perth, Australia. HMS Queen ...
each submarine fitted with Sonar 2076 providing the Royal Navy with the ‘biggest ears’ of any sonar system in service today each submarine
 
 
Nuclear-powered submarines for Australia? Maybe not so fast.
The Singapore Time - 29 October 2021
SYDNEY, Australia – When Australia loudly announced it would build nuclear-powered submarines with help from the United States and Britain ...
its submarine modernization efforts. The French-designed diesel submarine project Mr Morrison abandoned had succeeded a deal for Japanese-
 
 
Peter Dutton suggests looming French election part of fury over Australian AUKUS submarine deal | The Australian
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 29 October 2021
Defence Minister Peter Dutton has suggested the reason France remains “frustrated” about Australia scrapping the bilateral $90bn submarine deal is because of a looming election.
Defence Minister Peter Dutton has suggested the reason France remains “frustrated” about Australia scrapping the bilateral $90bn submarine deal is because of a looming election.
 
 
HMAS Stirling’s $1b upgrade for nuclear sub preparation
Sound Telegraph (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 29 October 2021
HMAS Stirling naval base will get a $1 billion Federally-funded upgrade to support a nuclear submarine being ...
in the nuclear submarine program. “Stirling is the home of our skilled submariners who have themselves played key role in the Collins class,
 
 
PODCAST: Unpacking the sub debate – Christopher Skinner
Defence Connect - 28 October 2021
30-year Royal Australian Navy veteran and editor of the Nuclear Propulsion Roadmap for Australia Christopher Skinner joins Liam Garman to ...
, the podcast wraps up looking at whether nuclear powered submarines may spur interest in nuclear technology, and the geopolitical impacts
 
 
Australia’s defence conversation must be about more than submarines
The Strategist - 28 October 2021
Most of Defence’s grilling in Senate estimates yesterday was about plans and issues around getting eight nuclear submarines for the Royal ...
Mead, head of the Nuclear-Powered Submarine Task Force , you got the feeling that there’d be a national cheer if a nuclear submarine was
 
 
Australia could build front half of nuclear-powered subs
Australian Defence Magazine - 28 October 2021
More details on Australia's intended acquisition of nuclear-powered submarines have come to light this week following a Senate ...
When asked if the RAN would lease British or American submarines to fill the capability gap as the Collins class nears the end of its life,
 
 
Netherlands will miss 2022 goal to pick Walrus-class submarine successor
Defense Brief - 28 October 2021
The Royal Netherlands Navy will not be able to identify a preferred bidder for the for the delivery of a successor for its Walrus-class ...
is the only type of submarines currently in service with the Royal Netherlands Navy. They are equipped with heavyweight torpedoes, as well
 
 
Sub deal may leave Australia exposed: Wong
Jimboomba Times (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 27 October 2021
Labor's Penny Wong questioned why a French submarine contract was cancelled without a replacement. The secretary ...
it can extend the life expectancy of the current Collins class submarines until a nuclear-powered submarine can be delivered. "We are hoping
 
 
‘Accelerate’: Australia looking at existing design to build nuclear-powered submarines
Brisbane Times (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 27 October 2021
Politics Federal AUKUS Australia’s new fleet of nuclear-powered submarines would preferably be based on an ...
first of the existing Collins-class submarines scheduled to go out of service from 2038 and the nuclear-propelled submarines potentially not
 
 
Senior defence official reveals plans to support Attack-class workers for six years.
The Advertiser (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 27 October 2021
The Defence department has made a promise to workers left high and dry by the dumped Attack-class submarines, ...
would be posted to overseas shipyards to gain experience on building nuclear-powered submarines. “The cohort we are talking about doesn’t
 
 
Australia weighed up axing $90 billion France submarine deal as far back as March, 2020: Greg Moriarty
The West Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 27 October 2021
Australia was considering acquiring nuclear submarines as far back as March last year, defence officials have ...
that officials should determine a way ahead of trilateral cooperation on nuclear powered submarines,” Mr Moriarty said. He stressed the
 
 
Making the shift to nuclear-powered submarines: training and recruiting
The Strategist - 27 October 2021
In the first post in this series , I considered the structure of the safety regimes needed to independently audit the Royal Australian ...
will be operating the six Collins-class submarines, which are critical to generating qualified submariners and defending Australia. As navy
 
 
Defence not considering submarine stop-gap solution
Defence Connect - 27 October 2021
An interim undersea warfare solution is not being pursued to fill a potential capability gap ahead of the delivery of Navy’s future nuclear ...
fill a potential capability gap ahead of the delivery of Navy’s future nuclear-powered submarines, the Secretary of Defence has confirmed.
 
 
The Australian Submarine Decision: Challenges and Next Steps
Second Line of Defense - 26 October 2021
By Robbin Laird
looking at the effort surrounding the future submarine program designed to deliver a new conventional submarine, that narrative was largely
 
 
Nuclear submarines are frequent visitors to Australia, new figures show
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 26 October 2021
An upcoming visit by a British nuclear submarine will be the first for more than seven years, but newly-released figures reveal visits to Australia by US nuclear boats are relatively frequent.
An upcoming visit by a British nuclear submarine will be the first for more than seven years, but newly-released figures reveal visits to Australia by US nuclear boats are relatively frequent.
 
 
Making the shift to nuclear-powered submarines: technical skills and oversight
The Strategist - 26 October 2021
In my last post, I explained the need for dual lines of responsibility for nuclear safety , with civilian authorities answerable to a ...
-class nuclear-powered attack submarine (SSN) crew of 98 is almost double that of Australia’s Collins-class conventional submarines. We will
 
 
Adelaide’s ASC wants to build promised nuclear boats
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 26 October 2021
The government-owned company that built the Collins-class submarines says it has all the core attributes needed to build the nations promised nuclear-powered submarines.
The government-owned company that built the Collins-class submarines says it has all the core attributes needed to build the nations promised nuclear-powered submarines.
 
 
Michael McGuire: Job losses at Adelaide’s Osborne shipyard show transition to nuclear subs will be tough
The Advertiser (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 26 October 2021
The worst, and probably most likely option, is that those promised nuclear subs will never be built in Adelaide, ...
2040s at the earliest. All of which means the already venerable Collins class submarines are going to be working for a lot longer than they
 
 
Op-ed for AFR Defence special
Mirage News - 26 October 2021
Australians are rightly concerned about tensions in the Indo-Pacific. As we confront a more uncertain region than we have known in decades ...
of at least eight nuclear-powered (not nuclear-armed) submarines. Compared to their conventional counterparts these submarines are superior
 
 
American-dominated panel advising government on submarines as Defence eyes US and UK choices for nuclear fleet
ABC News - 26 October 2021
Three senior American shipbuilding executives are being paid to advise Australia on submarines, but the Defence Department and government ...
to help Australia acquire nuclear-powered submarines. Over the next year and a half, the Defence Department’s Nuclear-Powered Submarine Task
 
 
Dutton dismisses subs obsolescence claims
Defence Connect - 26 October 2021
The defence minister has backed the government’s long-term investment in a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines amid suggestions the ...
, the UK and the US. Minister Dutton said the Royal Australian Navy’s future submarines — expected to be modelled on either the US Navy’s
 
 
France repairs nuclear sub ravaged by fire
Space War - 25 October 2021
The blaze that broke out on the Perle in June 2020 at the Mediterranean base at Toulon needed about 250 firefighters and support crew ...
In addition to its six nuclear-powered attack submarines, France also operates four submarines capable of firing nuclear ballistic missiles.
 
 
Officials grilled over ‘secret’ sub deal
Sound Telegraph (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 25 October 2021
Officials have remained tight-lipped over a submarine deal that caused an international rift with the French. Gary ...
in relation to submarine capability, therefore, would it be feasible, possible, to actually look at nuclear powered submarines.” Asked if
 
 
Rex Patrick: SA Senator says subs program will be one strategic debacle after another
The Advertiser (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 25 October 2021
The submarines program is a debacle and I simply don’t believe eight new subs will be built in Adelaide, writes ...
. As we wait for the first nuclear submarine to arrive, the first of our life-extended Collins-class submarines will have been retired. In
 
 
Australia needs a royal commission into nuclear power, argues former SA governor Kevin Scarce
The Mercury (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 25 October 2021
A former state governor has called for a royal commission into nuclear energy, saying a net zero target cannot be ...
necessarily would result in a civil nuclear industry. Asked if future Australian nuclear-powered submarines moored in capital city ports
 
 
For an astute nation such as ours, it’s clear the British submarine is the way to go
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 25 October 2021
On Saturday morning I missed my regular delivery of The Weekend Australian and resigned myself to the less attractive option of reading it on my monitor. But any misgivings were quickly dissolved as I read Gideon Haighs truly poetic lament on lockdown No ...
On Saturday morning I missed my regular delivery of The Weekend Australian and resigned myself to the less attractive option of reading it on my monitor. But any misgivings were quickly dissolved as I read Gideon Haighs truly poetic lament on lockdown No
 
 
As ‘metal pirates’ loot seabed treasures, there are fears Australia’s first submarine could be next
MSN - Australia - 24 October 2021
Scavengers, trophy hunters and “metal pirates” are looting the treasures under the seas – and there are fears Australia’s first submarine ...
the seas – and there are fears Australia’s first submarine could be next. Load Error The location of HMAS AE1’s wreck is a secret closely
 
 
Sinking feeling as submarine shambles dives to a new low
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 23 October 2021
Crucial testimony to Senate committees, plus parliamentary answers to questions, have gone substantially unreported but tell us one terrible truth Australia is going to be completely unprepared militarily for any maritime security challenge in the next ...
Crucial testimony to Senate committees, plus parliamentary answers to questions, have gone substantially unreported but tell us one terrible truth Australia is going to be completely unprepared militarily for any maritime security challenge in the next .
 
 
In defence of Australian shipbuilding
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 23 October 2021
To understand how much confusion still surrounds the governments historic shift to acquire nuclear-powered submarines, one needs to look no further than the Defence Department website.
To understand how much confusion still surrounds the governments historic shift to acquire nuclear-powered submarines, one needs to look no further than the Defence Department website.
 
 
Nuclear submarines may be ‘most complex man-made machine’ | The Australian
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 22 October 2021
Liberal MP Andrew Wallace says nuclear submarines are said to be “the most complex man-made machine that exist". “There’s no suggestion that these things aren’t complex, or suggestion that these things are easy to deliver because they’re not,” he told ...
Liberal MP Andrew Wallace says nuclear submarines are said to be “the most complex man-made machine that exist". “There’s no suggestion that these things aren’t complex, or suggestion that these things are easy to deliver because they’re not,” he told ..
 
 
British nuclear sub’s visit may be Astute ad
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 22 October 2021
Britain will press its case to build Australias promised nuclear-powered submarines during an upcoming visit by a British nuclear boat to Perth.
Britain will press its case to build Australias promised nuclear-powered submarines during an upcoming visit by a British nuclear boat to Perth.
 
 
Survey shows ‘stronger support’ for nuclear energy than expected: Chris Kenny | The Australian
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 22 October 2021
Research company Compass has done a survey on a sample of respondents, with results showing a “stronger support” for nuclear energy than expected, according to Sky News host Chris Kenny. “First some exclusive new polling about the one technology that ...
Research company Compass has done a survey on a sample of respondents, with results showing a “stronger support” for nuclear energy than expected, according to Sky News host Chris Kenny. “First some exclusive new polling about the one technology that ..
 
 
No safety assessment for nuclear subs in Adelaide
InDaily - 22 October 2021
The federal government has not undertaken a safety assessment or planning study for the prospect of docking nuclear-powered submarines in ...
Fremantle, Darwin and Brisbane. “While the safety assessments required for nuclear submarine construction and long-term berthing facilities
 
 
Strategic Choice: Australia’s Nuclear-Powered Submarines – Analysis
Eurasia Review - 22 October 2021
By Felix K. Chang*
-powered submarine can transit from Australia’s Stirling naval base, rumored to be the homeport for Australia’s future submarine fleet, to
 
 
AUKUS is about collaboration, not captivity
The Strategist - 22 October 2021
‘When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall, one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle.’ — ...
to many that AUKUS is not predominantly about submarines. Certainly, eight nuclear-powered submarines for the Royal Australian Navy will be
 
 
Termination for convenience: when and is it free?
Lexology - 21 October 2021
Termination for convenience clauses have drawn recent media attention given the Commonwealth’s recent decision to terminate the Future ...
for convenience clauses have drawn recent media attention given the Commonwealth’s recent decision to terminate the Future Submarine
 
 
IAEA chief: Aukus could set precedent for pursuit of nuclear submarines
MSN - Australia - 20 October 2021
The head of the UN’s nuclear watchdog has said other states could follow Australia’s example and seek to build nuclear-powered submarines, ...
the technical challenges in building a nuclear-propelled submarine. “To have a nuclear reactor in a submarine in a vessel operating safely
 
 
AUKUS – A VIEW FROM LONDON
Venturaapdr Partica Online - 20 October 2021
Just as the year’s largest international defence gathering, DSEI 21 in London, was drawing to an end the bombshell announcement on 16 ...
UK and the United States to co-operate on creating a new nuclear submarine capability for Australia caught everyone by surprise. There was a
 
 
Arthur Sinodinos on submarines and future industries
InnovationAus.com - 19 October 2021
The technology transfer opportunities of the new AUKUS submarine arrangements are a two-way street, but industry must start the hard work ...
table>” Speaking at the InnovationAus Capability: Submarines, Industrial Development and Future Industries forum on Tuesday, Mr Sinodinos
 
 
Greens want defence budget cut in half
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 19 October 2021
The Greens have called for the defence budget to be halved and Australias nuclear-powered submarine plans to be scrapped, arguing the nation should rely on effective communication to guard against military threats.
The Greens have called for the defence budget to be halved and Australias nuclear-powered submarine plans to be scrapped, arguing the nation should rely on effective communication to guard against military threats.
 
 
Sub Deal Good for Industry
Industry Update Manufacturing Magazine & Directory - 19 October 2021
Mainstream media reports on the AUKUS submarine agreement, and what it will mean for Australian industry and manufacturers, have left me ...
our interview. “Outside of the nuclear-related systems, there is a lot of similarity with a conventional submarine in terms of industrial
 
 
‘We are worried’: Indonesia and Malaysia express concern over Australia’s nuclear submarine plan
The Guardian - 19 October 2021
Aukus pact to obtain the high-tech vessels comes amid increasing tensions in the East and South China Seas
our territory that is purchasing new nuclear-powered submarines,” Saifuddin told a joint news conference on Monday after meeting counterpart
 
 
Why Indonesia should embrace AUKUS
East Asia Forum - 19 October 2021
Author: Arrizal Jaknanihan, Gadjah Mada University
a potential arms race following the plan to build eight nuclear-powered submarines in Australia. Singapore and the Philippines were more
 
 
AUKUS kicks Australia’s military transformation into gear
The Strategist - 19 October 2021
By ending the contract with the French and committing to nuclear submarines through AUKUS , Prime Minister Scott Morrison recognised what ...
20 billion set to be gone before the first submarine was in the water. Beginning an Australian nuclear submarine program will take time, and
 
 
Opting into the Orca program: A stop-gap undersea warfare solution
Defence Connect - 19 October 2021
Defence should consider procuring unmanned Boeing-built ‘Orcas’ to shore-up Navy’s undersea warfare capability ahead of the delivery of the ...
next-generation fleet. This, he claims, would also ensure the Future Submarine and its crews are “designed and prepared” to operate with
 
 
Fallout from AUKUS has ‘done more damage’ than originally thought | The Australian
The Australian (Licensed by Copyright Agency) - 18 October 2021
Sky News Washington correspondent Annelise Nielsen says “there has been more damage” than was originally thought in the fallout from the AUKUS agreement. A French submarine contract was cancelled by Australia just before publicly announcing a nuclear ...
Sky News Washington correspondent Annelise Nielsen says “there has been more damage” than was originally thought in the fallout from the AUKUS agreement. A French submarine contract was cancelled by Australia just before publicly announcing a nuclear ..
 

Authors Note: David (Chuckles) Nicholls Exec Director of SIA has been ordained with a new name being the “Strategic Snorter”. SS had an interview with David Astle (ABC Regional VIC) and covered many topics Submarine related. 0230 in the morning, but I was up and tuned in. Unfortunately the link only lasted 7 days but the SS nailed it and I imagine wearing a bow tie to boot.
 

ALL THINGS COLLINS

From Facebook - HMAS STIRLING dateline October 29:
A warm welcome to Australia to one of the Royal Navy's Astute Class nuclear-powered submarines. 🇦🇺👋🇬🇧
The crew have been at sea for an extensive period, and in line with COVID measures, are taking rest and respite before embarking on further operations at sea.
Australia and the United Kingdom share common interests in defending the rules-based global order, and our approaches to security issues are closely aligned as demonstrated with the recent #AUKUS announcement.
Enjoy your stay in Perth. ☀️
Media release 📖: https://bit.ly/UKSubVisit Defence Australia HMAS Stirling, Fleet Base West

This week Deputy Fleet Commander, Commodore Jonathon Earley hosted a tour of HMAS Stirling and a Royal Navy Nuclear Submarine alongside Fleet Base West.





 

Guests included the Governor of Western Australia Kim Beazley, Assistant Minister for Defence Andrew Hastie and Head of Maritime Systems, Rear Admiral Wendy Malcolm.
The submarine is part of a larger task group and is enjoying some well earned time off in the Perth area after more than seven months on deployment.
#AusNavy #YourADF HMAS Stirling, Fleet Base West Government House Western Australia UK in Australia - British High Commission, Canberra

 
May be an image of textEarly AUKUS Nuclear Boat Design Candidate






An 84 page document (click here) from the Australian Strategic Policy Institute which is interesting reading a few bleeding obvious explanations but well worth a four pack and a pie.
 
Deep down, you know it makes sense?
 
Awkward AUKUS Arrival
 
cid:part13.Gcq3lRmg.sz0Ic02U@toledotel.com
 
 
 

DVA MATTERS

 
Ray Kemp has his finger on the pulse as always and provides the following:
 
This is for SA TPI magazine and next Submarine Log
 
The basis of this change of Legislation is to remove a problem with the VEA act with treatment of Veterans with qualifying service/war like/non-warlike service and those without.
 
At present those with no qualifying, warlike or non warlike service in fact they just have defence service. What happens is that Centrelink assess there disability pension as income, as a result of that DVA then make a payment that replaces the amount lost by the reduction in pension by Centrelink.
 
By changing the Disability pension to Compensation payment means that the veterans receives the full payment and as it it not income tested they will maybe receive extra Rent assistance if they are receiving rent assistance.
 
I hope this helps.
 
Ray

https://www.dva.gov.au/sites/default/files/files/about%20dva/budgets/2021-22/totally-and-permanently-incapacitated-veterans-dfisa-payments.pdf
 
Dear Veteran supporter,
I write to let you know about the new independent legal service to support participants in the Royal Commission into Defence and Veteran Suicide.
The Defence and Veterans Legal Service (DAVLS) is a free national service that will provide independent information and legal advice to support Australian Defence Force personnel and veterans, as well as their families, carers and supporters, to safely share their experiences with the Royal Commission.
We are independent and separate from the Royal Commission, the Department of Defence, and the Department of Veterans’ Affairs. We are taxpayer funded through the Federal Attorney-General’s department and accountable to:
  • Provide legal advice and information to members of the public and to assist Australian Defence Force personnel and veterans, and their families, carers and supporters to access and engage with the Royal Commission. 
  • Provide a trauma-informed, culturally safe and accessible service nationally, including referral to counselling and other supports.
  • Provide community outreach and liaison, and community information and education sessions.
  • Operate for the duration of the Royal Commission. 
This service will operate from Monday 1st November and will take inquiries on 1800 33 1800 (Freecall).  
We will have a web site from Monday at https://defenceveteranslegalservice.org.au/ and I would encourage you to log on for more information, access to resources and referrals. You can also subscribe to our mailing list to stay informed of upcoming events and latest news.
Please see attached service brochure.
We are excited to get our offer of free assistance out to the veteran community and to work with your organisation in making our service and the Royal Commission responsive to the needs of veterans and their families and friends. To this end, could you share this email among your networks please?
We are very keen to hear from our stakeholders in the veteran community on all topics of interest or concern regarding the Royal Commission. For this, could you reply to this email, with the name of the best person for me to contact in your organisation and their contact details please?
I look forward to working with you to make the Royal Commission a success for ADF members, veterans and their families.
Best Regards,
Nicholas Warren
Community Engagement Officer (Mon – Wed)
Defence and Veterans Legal Service
W: defenceveteranslegalservice.org.au
P: 02 9219 5622 
Information line: 1800 33 1800
 
Royal Commission into Defence Suicide
 
https://veteranweb.asn.au/news/royal-commission-into-defence-and-veteran-suicide-to-open-in-brisbane/ 
 
OCTOBER 21, 2021  BY RAY PAYNE

Royal Commission into Defence and Veteran Suicide to open in Brisbane

We are pleased to announce the commencement of the Royal Commission into Defence and Veteran Suicide hearings and other updates regarding the work of the Commission.


Hearings

The Royal Commission into Defence and Veteran Suicide will hold its first public hearing at the Brisbane Convention Centre on Friday November 26.  More details will be announced in the coming weeks. The hearing will explain how the Commissioners will conduct the inquiry. The first block of public hearings where participants will give evidence begins in Brisbane on Monday November 29, 2021.

The ceremonial hearing will be open to the public if COVID restrictions allow. It will also be webcast.


Private sessions

People are being invited to share their experiences and register for a private session. This is an opportunity to meet a Commissioner as they consider any changes that are needed to help veterans and their supporters. These sessions will begin in November and continue for the duration of the Royal Commission.


Submissions

Anyone wishing to make a submission to the Commission can do so on the Commission’s website. The Commission will accept submissions until at least the end of March 2022. The closing date will be confirmed later this year.

Sharing your experiences will help the Commission understand:
• Systemic issues among Defence and veteran deaths by suicide
• Risk factors, and
• The availability of support services

The Royal Commission cannot decide or resolve individual cases or award compensation.


Minister’s Announcement

Last week the Federal Minister for Veterans’ Affairs and Defence Personnel announced the appointment of consultants McKinsey & Company to take action to improve the claims system for supporting veterans, administered by the Department of Veterans’ Affairs. The Minister is reported to have said that McKinsey & Co would be consulting with bereaved families of veterans who have died by suicide.

The Royal Commission looks forward to learning more about the scope and nature of the actions McKinsey & Co will be taking, and to working with the Department to ensure the interests and wellbeing of bereaved families are protected.

The Commission Chair Nick Kaldas said: “We are mindful that with both organisations seeking to work closely with Defence members, veterans and their families, our processes should support those involved and avoid being duplicative, conflicting or otherwise overwhelming.”


Support 

The Royal Commission acknowledges that coming forward to share your experience is a big step. We want to make it as easy as possible. Please tell us about any support you need. For more information, visit the Royal Commission website.


From the Commissioners

Hearing from people touched by the tragedy of suicide and suicidal behaviour is critical for Australia to learn and improve the lives of veterans and their families.

Your story can help others. We’re encouraging anyone who wants to share their experiences to come forward.

The experiences of veterans, families, support people, organisations and the broader community will help us understand the problem and make recommendations that may reduce the number of deaths by suicide.

Authors Note: Not a nice topic and forwarded by Buck Singh.
 

ANZMI FOLDS

I do note with interest, that the Australian New Zealand Medal Imposters  group have folded. They are responsible for two suicides not so long ago by falsely chastising Serving and ex Serving Defence Personal with little or know justification. Submariners in good standing have fallen foul to this pack of narcissistic geriatrics with nothing better to do. Good riddance and let the AFP and/or independent Government factor look after it. 
 
 

SICK PARADE

 
First and foremost, saw a post on FB from Tex O’Grady WRT Bob. He is currently on Life Support in RPAH Sydney and the prognosis is not good. Our thoughts and prayer are with Bob at this time.
 
Nothing back from State Secs WRT Ian Proger or Benny Hill and believe Darren Thompson is near on back to his normal self. Our National President’s progress will be advised by Dave Strangward.

 

AROUND THE TRAPS

 
OTAMA – Nothing heard. Left a message with the POC at Parks Victoria and awaiting a reply. There is a buzz going around but will not publish until confirmed.
 
PROJECT TOUCHSTONE – Nothing heard back from Peter Briggs but responses from SAA and UK have been positive. This initiative, when it comes to fruition, is history which we can proudly pass on to our community and in the tradition of ANZAC.
 
Come, cheer up, my lads, 'tis to glory we steer,
To add something more to this wonderful year.
To honour we call you, not press you like slaves,
For who are so free as the sons of the waves?

(Chorus)
Heart of oak are our ships, jolly tars are our men,
We always are ready; Steady, boys, steady.
We'll fight and we'll conquer again and again.

We never see our foes but we wish them to stay,
They never see us but they wish us away.
If they run, why we follow, and run them ashore,
And if they won't fight us, we can do no more.

Chorus;

Still Britain shall triumph, her ships plough the sea,
Her standard be Justice – her watchword, 'be free.'
Then cheer up, my lads, with one heart let us sing,
Our soldiers, our sailors, our statesmen and king.

Chorus;
 
 
 
Thumbnail image of a Lens result
 
I reckon one of them was a Submarine after the battle.
Subject: New Zealand Naval Warship Protocols for the 21st Century

 
MANY A TRUE WORD SPOKEN IN JEST
The Royal New Zealand Navy is proud to announce its new fleet of Type 45 destroyers
Having initially named the first two ships HMS Daring and HMS Dauntless, the Naming Committee has, after intensive pressure from The Green Party, renamed them HMS Cautious and HMS Prudence.
The next five ships are to be HMS Empathy,
HMS Circumspect, HMS Nervous, HMS Timorous and HMS Apologist.
Costing $850 million each, they comply with the very latest employment, equality, health & safety and human rights laws.
The Royal New Zealand Navy fully expects any future enemy to be jolly decent and to comply with the same high standards of behaviour.

The new user-friendly crow's nest has excellent wheelchair access.
Live ammunition has been replaced with paintballs to reduce the risk of anyone getting hurt and to cut down on the number of compensation claims.
Stress counsellors and lawyers will be on board, as will a full sympathetic industrial tribunal.

The crew will be 50/50 men and women, and will contain the correct balance of race, gender, sexuality and disability.
Sailors will only work a maximum of 37hrs per week as per Brussels Rules on Working Hours, even in wartime.
All the vessels are equipped with a maternity ward, a crèche and a gay disco.
Tobacco will be banned throughout the ship, but recreational cannabis will be allowed in wardrooms and messes.

The Royal New Zealand Navy is eager to shed its traditional reputation for; "Rum, sodomy and the lash"; so out has gone the rum ration, replaced by sparkling water.
Sodomy remains, now extended to include all ratings under 18. The lash will still be available on request.

Saluting of officers is now considered elitist and has been replaced by "Hello Sailor".
All information on notice boards will be in 37 different languages and Braille.
Crew members will now no longer have to ask permission to grow beards and/or moustaches.
This applies equally to female crew.

The MOD is inviting suggestions for a "non-specific" flag because the White Ensign may offend minorities.
The New Zealand flag must never be seen as this will offend.
The newly re-named HMS Cautious will be commissioned shortly by Captain Hook from the Canterbury Mosque who will break a petrol bomb over the hull.
She will gently slide into the sea as the Royal New Zealand Band plays "In the Navy" by the Village People.
Her first deployment will be to escort boatloads of illegal immigrants to ports in Auckland and Tauranga. The Prime Minister said, "Our ships reflect the very latest in modern thinking and they will always be able to comply with any new legislation or left thinking from The New Zealand Government or other soft thinking nerds from the Beehive.  The Prime Minister Adhern said "New Zealand waives the rules"                 
 

 World's Newest Class of Nuclear Attack Submarine: Rare Access Inside Suffren - Naval News
https://www.navalnews.com/naval-news/2021/10/rare-access-inside-suffren-submarine/
World's Newest Class of Nuclear Attack Submarine: Rare Access Inside Suffren
Suffren SSN during sea trials in 2020, South of Toulon. French Navy picture.

World’s Newest Class Of Nuclear Attack Submarine: Rare Access Inside Suffren

Leading Navies are secretive about the full capabilities of their submarines. In a rare privilege, Naval News has been allowed aboard the French Navy's (Marine Nationale) newest boat, Suffren. Here is what it is like to step inside a next generation nuclear-powered attack submarine.

Xavier Vavasseur  21 Oct 2021

We were first welcomed at Toulon naval base by the commander of ESNA (Escadrille des Sous-Marins Nucléaire d’Attaque), the French SSN fleet, Commander Jérôme Colonna d’Istria who introduced the French submarine force.

The force has a total of 3,200 sailors, 1,500 of them serve aboard the SSBNs and SSNs. France currently has four Le Triomphant-class SSBNs, and six attack submarines: five Rubis-class and the first-in-class Suffren.

Commander Colonna D’Istria explained while Suffren was delivered last year, operational missions are still being fulfilled by the 5 remaining Rubis-class SSNs which have now been serving the French Navy for three decades:

“These are submarines that we have kept up to date in a remarkable way and that have reached a significant operational maturity. The participation of the Emeraude in an Indo-Pacific deployment in early 2021 is the most obvious example of that maturity”.

That being said, the arrival of the Suffren-class submarines brings a lot of change for the ESNA.

“The Suffren is more stealthy, brings more endurance and firepower compared to the Rubis-class submarines. All this calls for new developments on our part, new tactics, new know-how which is currently our main focus with the Suffren: We have a lot of experimentation and tactical developments to do […] it is more agile, it is more stealthy therefore it calls for new tactics in all warfare domains”.



Commander Colonna D’Istria
 
Barracuda type SSN Suffren navigating South of Toulon Barracuda type SSN Suffren navigating South of Toulon. ©Axel Manzano/Marine Nationale/Défense.

The trials are now in the phase of “validation of military characteristics”. They are currently focusing on the weapon systems: The Suffren comes with two new weapons for the French Navy: The Naval Cruise Missile (MdCN by MBDA) and the F21 heavyweight torpedo by Naval Group. The validation of military characteristics consist in checking if the platform that was handed over last year by Naval Group to the procurement agency DGA meets the military need of the Navy. It is a lengthy process:

“The Suffren already spent more than 120 days at sea so far in 2021, over 3,000 hours dived […] we sailed the boat all the way to the Equator, we were able to evaluate its endurance over several dozen days.”
“The boat already fired about a dozen torpedoes. More firings will be conducted because we are in an incremental development process”

“We also validated the lock-out chamber for the naval special forces”.

Naval News also learned that Suffren called at Crete Naval Base (NATO Naval Support Activity, Souda Bay) to validate the submarine’s ability to interface with NATO standard naval bases and berths. The Suffren is set to enter active duty “in the coming months”.

“In terms of displacement, the Suffren-class is double the displacement of the Rubis-class, 5,100 tons compared to 2,600 tons, but at the same time Suffren has a smaller crew (63 compared to 72)”

The Suffren-class SSN is designed to perform in both blue water and littoral areas, and to do so further, longer and with more firepower than its Rubis-class predecessors. It is equipped with a highly automated platform management system and an innovative propulsion system. The Suffren‘s “silent speed” is double that of the Rubis-class SSN.

Another field where Suffren brings a revolution: Maintenance. The new submarine need just one technical stop per year (which lasts about 2.5 months) and may spend over 200 days at sea following these overhaul periods. This is thanks, among other things, to the implementation of predictive maintenance. To accommodate the Suffren-class, new infrastructures (berth, docks, cranes…) are being built at Toulon naval base.

Importance of the ENSM/BPN training faciliy

 
Training of submariners on the “Neptune” simulator. French Navy picture.

“For ESNA, the challenge of the decade to come will be to train our 1000 submariners for the new capabilities brought by the Suffren. For this, the key to success is the human resource tool that is the school of underwater navigation”

“One of the great successes of the Barracuda program was to think of this tool well in advance of the boat’s arrival. The simulators were delivered in 2015.”



Commander Colonna D’Istria

We were then shown the facility where French submariners are trained. Located right by the ESNA headquarters, it is the submarine navigation school (ENSM/BPM for école de navigation sous-marine et des bâtiments à propulsion nucléaire). For the past 100 years, this school is training French submarine crews (as well as the personnel in charge of the nuclear power aboard aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle). Over 600 sailors are trained every year, 20% of them officer grade. The school has 8 full scale simulators which train in the field of nuclear propulsion, platform management and even tactical combat in land attack, anti-surface warfare and anti-submarine warfare (for this, some of the simulators can be network allowing 1 on 1 or cooperative engagement). The school also use virtual reality technology to train the “rondiers” (sailors conducting security rounds, there are 6 of them aboard Suffren-class SSNs) with a fully immersive 3D representation of the submarine. It features interactive knobs and valves. The tool was developed by Naval Group who worked with a video game producer for the visual aspect. The tool is impressive and proves to be very effective with new generation of sailors.

Having access to the advanced simulators so early in advance helped ESNA to not only train the first crews of Suffren on how to operated the submarine, but also to work on the organization inside the submarine, to work on training programs and to start developing new tactics.

Aboard Suffren

 
At the Propulsion control station (Poste de contrôle propulsion or PCP), the helmsman is supervised by the XO. The submarine is driven by two joysticks. French Navy picture.

It was time to step aboard the Suffren. Commander Antoine Richebé, the commanding officer of Suffren welcomed us. We had to leave our smartphones and smartwatches behind us. The French Navy treats Suffren as a very sensitive asset. We accessed the submarine via a ladder located aft of the sail, in the same area where the lock-out chamber for special forces is located. We then entered the CIC. My main impressions were “space” and “modernity”. I previously had the privilege to step inside only two submarines: HNLMS Bruinvis, a Dutch Walrus-class submarine and HSwMS Södermanland of the Swedish Navy. Both are from the late 1980ies, both are much smaller diesel submarines. Therefore the comparison is not fair: The CIC of Suffren (and generally speaking every compartments aboard) is much more modern and much more spacious (relatively speaking). You really feel you stepped in a next generation and state-of-the-art vessel. Yet, I was naively expecting a fully digital set up. However there are still “good old” manual and physical valve wheels, knobs, pressure gauges a little bit everywhere onboard (expect in the mess, berthing compartments and maybe a lot less, but still present here and there, in the CIC). I was told this was obviously for safety reasons and that “full digital” setups aboard submarines is not likely to happen any times soon…

To give you a good idea of how the CIC of Suffren is, this CGI video is a pretty accurate representation:

 

The CIC consists features 10 multifunction consoles, plus a central seat for the commanding officer and a large tactile table which can be used for cooperative mission planning, navigation, show footage from the optronic masts…

While all consoles are multifunction and the same (except two which feature joysticks to steer the various masts), the CIC aboard Suffren is organized in the following way:

  • Two consoles to the right of the commanding officer (CO) are dedicated to sonars
  • One console to the right of the CO is dedicated to the acoustic analyst (the so called “oreille d’or”, French for golden ear)
  • The next console on the right is dedicated to the MOAS and terrain following. Fun fact: The CO explained that the French Navy is working on a technology that would allow to submarine crew to precisely identifying their location by analyzing the shape of the bottom of the sea. He showed us on the screen a 3D representation of the sea bottom. This would obviously only work in well documented area but it a big plus in GPS denied environment or if the submarine needs to remain dived for extended periods and can not re-calibrate its INS.
  • The final console on the right hand side is dedicated to the optronic masts.
  • To the left of the CO is the second console dedicated to the optronic masts.
  • Two tactical consoles (including EW)
  • One console for weapons engagement
  • One console for the F21 torpedo (where the operator can steer the torpedo as long as the optical fiber is still attached to it)
 
In the CIC, around the chart table, the CO, the XO and acoustic analysts plan the continuation of the transit according to the tactical situation of the submarine. French Navy picture.

Virtually all the equipment in the CIC is of French origin. I did spot however a “Falcon II” radio by Harris. I enquired about it and the Commanding Officer explained that this radio is needed in specific situations involving NATO or US units because of specific encryption.

Commander Richebé explained that in combat operations, there can be up to 15 sailors in the CIC. Forward of the consoles but in the same “room” are two positions which combine damage control, platform management and “driving of the boat”. We were told that the Suffren is very easy to drive. It is done via two joysticks. One of the helmsman of the submarine is just 19 year old.

We then went into the officer’s mess. It was roomy, modern and very comfortable. We spotted some wifi routers in there and the CO confirmed: There is a private/closed wifi aboard which allows the crew to access key data from wherever aboard the boat. The wifi network also is a security feature allowing to located 24/7 the location of each crew member (via an RFID chip in the sailors uniform). We were then shown a berthing compartment: 6 berth per compartment. There too it “appeared” to be comfortable: Each bunk gets its own light, power outlet and USB port. The USB port gives the sailor access to an entertainment platform where they can watch movies on their free time. Naval Group used a contractor experienced in cruise ship furnishing to design the interior of some of the living quarters such as the messes and berthing compartments in order to increase crew comfort.

Commander Antoine Richebé then took us down one deck (there is a total of 3 decks aboard), and we entered the torpedo room. The torpedo handling system is as follows: 5 rows on two levels on the left and 5 rows on two level on the right (we were standing in between each). While we were aboard there were:

  • 1 training torpedo (recognizable by its orange paint)
  • 4 black F21 heavyweight torpedo (the CO confirmed those were “live rounds”).
  • 4 naval cruise missiles.
  • 3 SM39 Exocet anti-ship missiles.

The missiles (both anti-ship and naval cruise missiles) were wrapped in some kind of fabric sleeves. We were told that these were thermal protection necessary because of the fuel of the missiles. Suffren can carry a total of 20 weapon in the torpedo handling system. Commander Richebé added that the maximum load out is 24 if the submarines sails out with pre-loaded torpedo tubes. He confirmed to be that even in this situation, weapons can still be swapped around. “It becomes like a Tetris game and is a bit cramped but it is do-able”.

We were then showed the large fridge (large enough to store 70 days worth of food for the entire crew) and we climbed our way back up to the lock-out chamber compartment. Up to 5 fully equipped “Commando Hubert” operators (the combat divers unit of the French Naval Special Forces) can fit in the chamber. The device can also serve as the aft emergency escape hatch.

About Suffren

 
Suffren submarine sail cusp The Suffren-class features a sail cusp: A single-piece composite fairing structure attached to the submarine sail and hull. It improves hydrodynamic performance by allowing smooth laminar flow of water over its surface. ©Axel Manzano/Marine Nationale/Défense.

Six new attack submarines will form the vanguard of the French Navy (Marine Nationale) for the coming decades. Developed as the Barracuda program, the lead boat of the new class, Suffren, was launched in July 2019 is expected to formally join the fleet next year. The new submarines will offer a massive capability leap over the current Rubis-class boats.

Suffren in numbers:

  • Surface displacement: 4,700 tons
  • Diving displacement: 5,100 tons
  • Length: 99 meters
  • Diameter: 8.8 meters
  • Maximum depth: > 350 meters
  • Speed: > 25 knots
  • Armament: naval cruise missiles, F21 heavy-weight wire-guided torpedoes, modernized Exocet SM39 anti-ship missiles, FG-29 mines, D-19 UUV (future development)
  • Hybrid propulsion: pressurized water reactor (150MW) derived from the reactors on board the Triomphant-class SSBN and Charles-de-Gaulle aircraft carrier, two propulsion turbines, two turbo generators and two electric motors
  • Crew: 63 crew members + approx. 15 commandos
  • Endurance: 70 days at sea (or until food supplies run out)

Innovation for naval combat

The Suffren is equipped with numerous innovations that allow it to demonstrate differentiating capabilities in many areas. The French Navy’s new submarine is able to strike deep behind enemy line all while remaining stealthy thanks to the torpedo tube-launched naval cruise missile (MdCN). The integration of state-of-the-art sensors also gives it superior anti-submarine warfare and intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance (ISR) capabilities. Commander Colonna D’Istria mentioned that the non-penetrating optronic masts (by Safran Electronic and Defense) were a disruptive technology. They bring unmatched high quality (4K) imagery and every sailor in the CIC can access them. Finally, Suffren comes with systems that facilitate the deployment of naval special forces. In particular, the Dry Deck Shelter, a removable deck hangar, allows the deployment of the new PSM3G swimmer delivery vehicle (SDV) and a dozen combat swimmers.

 
Suffren with the Dry Deck Shelter (DDS) fitted behind the sail. The DDS allows the transport, launch and recovery of the PSM3G swimmer delivery vehicle (SDV) of the “Commando Hubert”. French Navy picture.

Further, longer, with a smaller crew

The Suffren also brings its share of improvements to the benefit of the 63 sailors who constitute each of its two crews (the French Navy uses a dual crew system for all its submarines and some of its surface ships). Many equipment have been automated, or their use simplified. Living conditions have also been improved, with the sailors gaining in privacy and comfort with more personal space compared to the Rubis-class SSN, as well as a greater number of showers.

 

Some old - some new?
 

    
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SO TRUE!
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

Around the Traps

Lots of calls over the last few weeks and always great to hear from you all. Of note Steve Thomas  who’s hair is grey and body is round and still talks underwater with a mouth full of marbles is still annoying the crap out of Sky Larkin and me (three stooges a lifetime ago) as is Bernie Bernhagen up in Qld.
 
SAA NSW has their XMAS Bash at Gosford first weekend in December at Gosford RSL for the Grey Nomads heading towards Sydney over that period.
 
Nothing heard from the National MC Club but Tim Bass will rattle a few chains.
 
Friends of Holebrook (per Thor Lund) are active and encourage you to check out their website.
 
Port Phillip Papers have been released and a good read as is the Trade (UK Version).
 
FUNNIES (as always, go to this link for the Coxswains Comedy Store. In fact it should be called the Wiggy, Buck, Jeffy Boy, Pricky and JJJ Store. Funny as, but may be offensive to those not of the Trade).
 
THE IRISH PROSTITUTE

 An Irish
          daughter had not been home for over a year.  Upon her return,
           her Father cussed her. 'Where have ye been all this time? Why
          did ye not write to us, not even a line? Why didn't ye call? Can ye
          not understand what ye put yer old Mother thru?' 
 The
          girl, crying, replied, 'Sniff, sniff....Dad....I became a
          prostitute...' 
  'Ye what!!? Out of here, ye shameless
          harlot!  Sinner! You're a disgrace to this Catholic
          family.' 
 'OK, Dad-- as ye wish. I just came back to
          give mum this luxurious fur coat, title deed to a ten bedroom mansion
          plus a $5 million savings  certificate. For me little brother,
          this gold Rolex. And for ye Daddy, the sparkling new Mercedes limited
          edition convertible that's parked outside plus a membership to the
          country club fer Golf......................... (takes a
          breath)............. and an invitation for ye all to  spend New
          Years Eve on board my new yacht in the Riviera and...
          .' 
 'Now what was it ye said ye had become?' says
          Dad. 
 Girl, crying again, 'Sniff, sniff.....a prostitute
          Daddy! Sniff, sniff.' 
  'Oh! Be Jesus! Ye scared me half
          to death, girl!  I thought ye said a Protestant. Come here and
          give yer old Dad a
        hug.

 
  
Surely that is sufficient for this edition, until next fortnight take care of family and you and stay safe and adhere to respective restrictions in place.

Shut and Clipped for this week


Yours Aye 
 
Greg Jones #6
coxswain@submarinesaustralia.com
0432 559 283
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